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I like this one,for promoting a sense of awe and wonder..and inquiry: there is a 'gap' in the graph of the function - obviously at x=1 - of y = ( n$n=1$, of / n-1)^n$y = \big(\frac{n}{n-1}\big)^n$..since. since it is a gap,it it must be able to be 'bridged' you would think,but but since it also is a gap of zero dimensions it can't be: it both can and can't 'exist' simultaneously..it's it's 'there'..but but when we try to measure it in physical terms..it's it's not!

I like this one,for promoting a sense of awe and wonder..and inquiry: there is a 'gap' in the graph of the function - obviously at x=1 - of y = ( n / n-1)^n..since it is a gap,it must be able to be 'bridged' you would think,but since it also is a gap of zero dimensions it can't be: it both can and can't 'exist' simultaneously..it's 'there'..but when we try to measure it in physical terms..it's not!

I like this one,for promoting a sense of awe and wonder..and inquiry: there is a 'gap' in the graph of the function - obviously at $n=1$, of $y = \big(\frac{n}{n-1}\big)^n$... since it is a gap, it must be able to be 'bridged' you would think, but since it also is a gap of zero dimensions it can't be: it both can and can't 'exist' simultaneously.. it's 'there'.. but when we try to measure it in physical terms.. it's not!

1
source | link

I like this one,for promoting a sense of awe and wonder..and inquiry: there is a 'gap' in the graph of the function - obviously at x=1 - of y = ( n / n-1)^n..since it is a gap,it must be able to be 'bridged' you would think,but since it also is a gap of zero dimensions it can't be: it both can and can't 'exist' simultaneously..it's 'there'..but when we try to measure it in physical terms..it's not!