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Seconding/complementing other answers: Python (and/or Python as a part of Sage) has a command-line interface (on Linux/Unix and on Mac OS) that does allow defining variables, pre-loading files that set things up, and so on. Python (and, thus, Sage) has built-in large integers that are easier to use than C++ large integers (in my opinion). And freely available.

EDIT: ... and (I forgot to mention) it is quite easy to use the built-in graphing and graphical capabilities of Sage (especially in the "notebook" mode).

Seconding/complementing other answers: Python (and/or Python as a part of Sage) has a command-line interface (on Linux/Unix and on Mac OS) that does allow defining variables, pre-loading files that set things up, and so on. Python (and, thus, Sage) has built-in large integers that are easier to use than C++ large integers (in my opinion). And freely available.

Seconding/complementing other answers: Python (and/or Python as a part of Sage) has a command-line interface (on Linux/Unix and on Mac OS) that does allow defining variables, pre-loading files that set things up, and so on. Python (and, thus, Sage) has built-in large integers that are easier to use than C++ large integers (in my opinion). And freely available.

EDIT: ... and (I forgot to mention) it is quite easy to use the built-in graphing and graphical capabilities of Sage (especially in the "notebook" mode).

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Seconding/complementing other answers: Python (and/or Python as a part of Sage) has a command-line interface (on Linux/Unix and on Mac OS) that does allow defining variables, pre-loading files that set things up, and so on. Python (and, thus, Sage) has built-in large integers that are easier to use than C++ large integers (in my opinion). And freely available.