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Welcome to the site!

It's great that you're motivated and want to get a perfect grade in your studies! There is no actual formula for getting a perfect grade. One goal among all the goals of your math educators is to deepen your understanding of the mathematics you are studying in class and in whatever books your reading. There are things you can do to address this as well. I will suggest one. Because you seem so motivated, I think this is something that could work for you.

If you haven't already done this, consider forming a study group with other students in your class. It doesn't matter so much whether they are more or less advanced students than you. A mix may actually be good. The aim, primarily, is to gather a few like-minded people who are motivated to think about mathematics together. It's important that you're comfortable talking together about ideas, and especially putting forward suggestions that may not be "correct."

If you can form such a group (even maybe just 2 or 3 people), have meetings around a number of goals and questions such as:

  • Discuss the ideas in a chapter (or chapter section) you all have agreed to read.
    • What was challenging about it?
    • What seemed obvious about it?
    • What are you still unclear about?
    • Where might it be useful?
    • Did anything seem especially interesting? Exciting? Pointless? Annoying? If so, why?
    • Do you feel there is a better way to do something presented in the chapter? Why is this other way better?
  • Find online sources of information related to things you've already read in the book chapters.
    • Are there differences in how these concepts are presented?
    • Did anyone find a presentation they found easier to understand? How does that explanation relate to what you read in your textbook>textbook?
  • Solve problems you've found in other books (or online)
    • What different approaches occur to you?
    • What are the relative advantages/disadvantages of various approaches?
    • What is surprising about these problems?
    • Are there problems you just can't solve? Do people get hung up in the same place? Consider asking a teacher if there is some approach that will help you solve this problem.
  • Brainstorm applications for the mathematics you're learning.
    • What contexts do the textbooks and other sources suggest?
    • Where is this mathematics generally used?
    • Search online to find what applications the math may relate to. What did different people find? Does it intersect with any of your interests?
    • Is the math you're learning part of a trajectory leading to some advanced math you know you will be encountering int he future?

You can come up with your own ways of discussing the mathematics you're learning, I'm sure. Obviously, your group could mostly be about discussing and comparing approaches to solutions, or even working problems collaboratively. The point is that there can be a lot to talk about related to your mathematics learning, so a group like this has very few limits. And these discussions could be very productive.

One word of caution: be very mindful of your teacher's rules about homework collaboration. There's nothing wrong with taking on extra problems and working them collaboratively, but your teacher may have good reasons to establish very specific rules on the homework you've been individually assigned. Just be clear on those rules and you'll be fine.

Welcome to the site!

It's great that you're motivated and want to get a perfect grade in your studies! There is no actual formula for getting a perfect grade. One goal among all the goals of your math educators is to deepen your understanding of the mathematics you are studying in class and in whatever books your reading. There are things you can do to address this as well. I will suggest one. Because you seem so motivated, I think this is something that could work for you.

If you haven't already done this, consider forming a study group with other students in your class. It doesn't matter so much whether they are more or less advanced students than you. A mix may actually be good. The aim, primarily, is to gather a few like-minded people who are motivated to think about mathematics together. It's important that you're comfortable talking together about ideas, and especially putting forward suggestions that may not be "correct."

If you can form such a group (even maybe just 2 or 3 people), have meetings around a number of goals and questions such as:

  • Discuss the ideas in a chapter (or chapter section) you all have agreed to read.
    • What was challenging about it?
    • What seemed obvious about it?
    • What are you still unclear about?
    • Where might it be useful?
    • Did anything seem especially interesting? Exciting? Pointless? Annoying? If so, why?
    • Do you feel there is a better way to do something presented in the chapter? Why is this other way better?
  • Find online sources of information related to things you've already read in the book chapters
    • Are there differences in how these concepts are presented?
    • Did anyone find a presentation they found easier to understand? How does that explanation relate to what you read in your textbook>
  • Solve problems you've found in other books (or online)
    • What different approaches occur to you?
    • What are the relative advantages/disadvantages of various approaches?
    • What is surprising about these problems?
    • Are there problems you just can't solve? Do people get hung up in the same place? Consider asking a teacher if there is some approach that will help you solve this problem.
  • Brainstorm applications for the mathematics you're learning.
    • What contexts do the textbooks and other sources suggest?
    • Where is this mathematics generally used?
    • Search online to find what applications the math may relate to. What did different people find? Does it intersect with any of your interests?
    • Is the math you're learning part of a trajectory leading to some advanced math you know you will be encountering int he future?

You can come up with your own ways of discussing the mathematics you're learning, I'm sure. Obviously, your group could mostly be about discussing and comparing approaches to solutions, or even working problems collaboratively. The point is that there can be a lot to talk about related to your mathematics learning, so a group like this has very few limits. And these discussions could be very productive.

One word of caution: be very mindful of your teacher's rules about homework collaboration. There's nothing wrong with taking on extra problems and working them collaboratively, but your teacher may have good reasons to establish very specific rules on the homework you've been individually assigned. Just be clear on those rules and you'll be fine.

Welcome to the site!

It's great that you're motivated and want to get a perfect grade in your studies! There is no actual formula for getting a perfect grade. One goal among all the goals of your math educators is to deepen your understanding of the mathematics you are studying in class and in whatever books your reading. There are things you can do to address this as well. I will suggest one. Because you seem so motivated, I think this is something that could work for you.

If you haven't already done this, consider forming a study group with other students in your class. It doesn't matter so much whether they are more or less advanced students than you. A mix may actually be good. The aim, primarily, is to gather a few like-minded people who are motivated to think about mathematics together. It's important that you're comfortable talking together about ideas, and especially putting forward suggestions that may not be "correct."

If you can form such a group (even maybe just 2 or 3 people), have meetings around a number of goals and questions such as:

  • Discuss the ideas in a chapter (or chapter section) you all have agreed to read.
    • What was challenging about it?
    • What seemed obvious about it?
    • What are you still unclear about?
    • Where might it be useful?
    • Did anything seem especially interesting? Exciting? Pointless? Annoying? If so, why?
    • Do you feel there is a better way to do something presented in the chapter? Why is this other way better?
  • Find online sources of information related to things you've already read in the book chapters.
    • Are there differences in how these concepts are presented?
    • Did anyone find a presentation they found easier to understand? How does that explanation relate to what you read in your textbook?
  • Solve problems you've found in other books (or online)
    • What different approaches occur to you?
    • What are the relative advantages/disadvantages of various approaches?
    • What is surprising about these problems?
    • Are there problems you just can't solve? Do people get hung up in the same place? Consider asking a teacher if there is some approach that will help you solve this problem.
  • Brainstorm applications for the mathematics you're learning.
    • What contexts do the textbooks and other sources suggest?
    • Where is this mathematics generally used?
    • Search online to find what applications the math may relate to. What did different people find? Does it intersect with any of your interests?
    • Is the math you're learning part of a trajectory leading to some advanced math you know you will be encountering int he future?

You can come up with your own ways of discussing the mathematics you're learning, I'm sure. Obviously, your group could mostly be about discussing and comparing approaches to solutions, or even working problems collaboratively. The point is that there can be a lot to talk about related to your mathematics learning, so a group like this has very few limits. And these discussions could be very productive.

One word of caution: be very mindful of your teacher's rules about homework collaboration. There's nothing wrong with taking on extra problems and working them collaboratively, but your teacher may have good reasons to establish very specific rules on the homework you've been individually assigned. Just be clear on those rules and you'll be fine.

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source | link

Welcome to the site!

It's great that you're motivated and want to get a perfect grade in your studies! There is no actual formula for getting a perfect grade. One goal among all the goals of your math educators is to deepen your understanding of the mathematics you are studying in class and in whatever books your reading. There are things you can do to address this as well. I will suggest one. Because you seem so motivated, I think this is something that could work for you.

If you haven't already done this, consider forming a study group with other students in your class. It doesn't matter so much whether they are more or less advanced students than you. A mix may actually be good. The aim, primarily, is to gather a few like-minded people who are motivated to think about mathematics together. It's important that you're comfortable talking together about ideas, and especially putting forward suggestions that may not be "correct."

If you can form such a group (even maybe just 2 or 3 people), have meetings around a number of goals and questions such as:

  • Discuss the ideas in a chapter (or chapter section) you all have agreed to read.
    • What was challenging about it?
    • What seemed obvious about it?
    • What are you still unclear about?
    • Where might it be useful?
    • Did anything seem especially interesting? Exciting? Pointless? Annoying? If so, why?
    • Do you feel there is a better way to do something presented in the chapter? Why is this other way better?
  • Find online sources of information related to things you've already read in the book chapters
    • Are there differences in how these concepts are presented?
    • Did anyone find a presentation they found easier to understand? How does that explanation relate to what you read in your textbook>
  • Solve problems you've found in other books (or online)
    • What different approaches occur to you?
    • What are the relative advantages/disadvantages of various approaches?
    • What is surprising about these problems?
    • Are there problems you just can't solve? Do people get hung up in the same place? Consider asking a teacher if there is some approach that will help you solve this problem.
  • Brainstorm applications for the mathematics you're learning.
    • What contexts do the textbooks and other sources suggest?
    • Where is this mathematics generally used?
    • Search online to find what applications the math may relate to. What did different people find? Does it intersect with any of your interests?
    • Is the math you're learning part of a trajectory leading to some advanced math you know you will be encountering int he future?

You can come up with your own ways of discussing the mathematics you're learning, I'm sure. Obviously, your group could mostly be about discussing and comparing approaches to solutions, or even working problems collaboratively. The point is that there can be a lot to talk about related to your mathematics learning, so a group like this has very few limits. And these discussions could be very productive.

One word of caution: be very mindful of your teacher's rules about homework collaboration. There's nothing wrong with taking on extra problems and working them collaboratively, but your teacher may have good reasons to establish very specific rules on the homework you've been individually assigned. Just be clear on those rules and you'll be fine.