5
$\begingroup$

Consider the case of a college remedial/developmental course; traditionally arithmetic and elementary algebra. If we had the opportunity to pick a new program for the course, and wanted to include some basic logic exposition in it, is there a textbook like that?

In sum, the course would cover some combination like: Logic, basic operations, solving equations by inverses, graphing, estimations and double-checks, etc. Anything like that? Open educational resource (OER) options are also open to consideration.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is it necessary to use a single text for the course? It might make the most sense to find a logic text that suits your specific needs, and use that as a supplementary text and/or use excerpts. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Sanfratello May 17 '16 at 19:03
3
$\begingroup$

You might be able to find a "math appreciation" or "math for elementary education majors" type of text that works for you. Around 1993-1996 I taught perhaps 12 to 15 semester courses from an earlier edition of Mathematical Ideas by Miller/Heeren/Hornsby for a 2-semester course sequence for students (in nursing, education, and some other related majors) that was their first math class after finishing the remedial/developmental courses. Students found this material easier than their remedial/developmental courses (and in many ways it was actually easier in an absolute sense, and not just in a relative sense due to the students having more math background when they took the courses), so I can easily see this text working for some remedial/developmental programs.

Alternatively, instead of trying to find a single text for everything, perhaps look for suitable logic material independently from looking for a text for the other topics, such as something from the internet, or one or more book chapters copied with permission and bound by your bookstore (or library), or something written by your department and bound by your bookstore (or library) and sold cheaply to students, etc.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.