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I've been using my tablet for years teaching in a high school. Now I moved to another school teaching middle school. I spoke to the principal and he said there's no problem in using a tablet as long as it doesn't have a SIM card or any distracting apps (social networks, chatting, etc.). After the first week of school, they are telling me that "students don't accept this tablet in class" and they consider it "no different from a cellphone". I explained to them that all my books and courses are on it and it isn't easy to print all of them and that, after a little time, students won't notice it anymore. I also explained to the students that this tablet contains their course and exercises and that I only use it as a reader but that didn't help much.

So, is it normal to ban a tablet in school? If so, it seems I only have two choices: either print all the courses or stop working at this school. What should I do about it?

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    $\begingroup$ tab=tablet? And do all the students have a "tab" or are you projecting yours? $\endgroup$ – Joseph O'Rourke Sep 27 '17 at 15:58
  • $\begingroup$ @JosephO'Rourke yes it's a tablet. I don't have any projector in class. I use the tablet just to read from just as I use a paper. It's way more efficient, I don't have to constantly print and carry a lot of papers. $\endgroup$ – llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Sep 27 '17 at 19:20
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    $\begingroup$ Oh... Maybe you can get the school on a path towards more (modern) technology in the classroom (it might be quite a long road, though, if they don't even have projectors...). $\endgroup$ – Dirk Sep 28 '17 at 8:52
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    $\begingroup$ The lunatics are running this asylum. $\endgroup$ – Daniel R. Collins Sep 28 '17 at 14:59
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    $\begingroup$ I do understand why the students can't use tablets, but I don't understand why you can't use it. $\endgroup$ – user26832 Sep 29 '17 at 13:25
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  1. (edit) I just reread the question. I would just stick to what you are doing and say the principle approved it. It is not clear who "they" is in the context of the complaints. If the principal changes his mind and gives you a direct order, then comply with that new order. But don't get dragged into debate with colleagues or kids.

  2. My advice is to consider this an issue between you and the administration. The issue of the students is not the key concern. Yes, I get that the admins refer to this and I get the kids chip in on it, but at the end of the day, students get used to what happens. I would just not engage them in debate. It's not up to them.

  3. As far as the admin: Either you just do what they tell you or you get them to allow you to do things how you prefer. It is hard for me to understand how much of a big deal it is or not. Or how important you are to them. My gut would be just to follow policy. But it may be possible that they can/will bend.

  4. I get that you are used to this tool and it makes you more efficient, but perhaps there is some workaround. Transferring things to a cheap used laptop (is that allowed)? Or just some efficient paper based system--I'm old enough so that I remember teachers using those little attendance/grading books that look like a ledger. Perhaps you are using a lot of worksheets or the like, but could convert to using the textbook more or the chalkboard (for drill)? Also, transparencies and overhead projection can be very easy (faster than writing chalk and erasing). And you can save the content (use permanent ink, use those 3 hole sheet protector sleeve things to put the acetate sheets in). Donno, and not saying it will be as nice as your system on your tablet. But think about it and how important the job is. [And at the end of the day, don't stress too much. Life goes on and every job has its little BS. How do the other teaches get their classes done? Why can't you do what they do?]

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  • $\begingroup$ A laptop is a bigger problem in class. It seems that the person responsible in dealing with students' complaints is weak. I will try to stick with the tablet and see what will happen in the following days. It's a small school and they constantly change their rules, the rules that they (administration) don't follow. $\endgroup$ – llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Sep 27 '17 at 19:17

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