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At a local Math Circle, I loved some problems worked out through a hinged mirror to illustrate symmetry. I bought a hinged mirror from hand2mind.com, and am looking for some material, ideally books about symmetry that encourage use of the mirror, but .pdf diagrams as well. Does anybody have any pointers? Thanks.

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  • $\begingroup$ I assume that you saw the hinged mirror activity book from the same website? $\endgroup$ – Mike Pierce Feb 12 '18 at 1:43
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, I also bought that. It's decent but I'm looking for even more activities with the hinged mirror. Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Dilip Feb 12 '18 at 5:15
  • $\begingroup$ Please let us know what level the students are. $\endgroup$ – Amy B Feb 12 '18 at 20:36
  • $\begingroup$ 3rd grade. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Dilip Feb 13 '18 at 8:31
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I've done wonderful activities from AIMS, including making kaleidoscopes. You can search their site for other PDF's and books by using the search words mirrors or symmetry.

Math Salamanders also have some free worksheets about symmetry and mirrors.

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It depends what level you want. There are mirror activities for young kids in Moebius Noodles (by my publisher).

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You could do platonic solids via their reflection groups. There is some material here: http://www.cutoutfoldup.com/818-platonic-solids-kaleidoscope.php

There's also Conway et. al.'s The Symmetries of Things which has some mirror related material in the beginning. However, I think that would be something to build material out of rather than use directly.

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I understand that this is an English-language based platform but I thought it could be of some interest to share with you some links to projects about symmetry in Italian primary schools. After all math is an universal language, isn't it? Well, well,... at least I hope that pictures are self-explanatory.

Material from a primary school

A University web-site producing activities for primary schools

On a personal level let me add that I personally tried, with some fun, having kids explore symmetries in Escher tessellations Escher

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice! I love the geometric constructions. Are there good sources to step one through such constructions? I taught my daughter last year Making an Equilateral Triangle with a Compass and a Ruler two different ways, and she loved it. I'd love to find a collection of constructions that I could teach. $\endgroup$ – Dilip Feb 20 '18 at 4:38
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The UCLA math circle has several activities involving symmetry. For example:

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  • $\begingroup$ This is perfect! Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Dilip Feb 20 '18 at 4:20

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