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Context: I am an assistant professor of mathematics at a small institution in the US.

Our department uses Stewart's Essential Calculus for our calculus sequence, but I find that my students and I are definitely under-using the book.

In particular, I only use the text to assign "suggested problems", which are simply practice to help my students prepare for quizzes/exams. As such, Stewart's book is not of significant enough value for students to be willing to buy it, which means that many of them study less than they probably should.

This brings me to my question: Are there cheaper texts out there that are merely "workbooks"--just lists of practice problems with answers? I'm hoping to find something that students could buy for less than $40 that would correspond (at least somewhat) with the material in Stewart's text.

(I still assign graded homework problems that I write myself, but I don't currently have the time to write practice problems too.)

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You may consider using an Open Education Resource (OER) such as Matt Boelkins' text Active Calculus. It is available on the web, utilizing WeBWorK for feedback on homework sets, and also has PDF and Print versions.

Of course, this is much more than simply a "workbook", but it would certainly serve the purpose of having a list of problems to solve.

https://activecalculus.org/

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Of course there are many drill manuals out there. Humongous, Schaum's, etc. They are often superior to assigned texts in that they have the answers to all the drill (not just odds) and in some cases written solutions. Usually they are less verbose (easier for kids to scan for formulae and examples). And are often written with simpler English (less of a need to preen for text selection committees, more student oriented).

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    $\begingroup$ If you are referring to the Humongous Book of Calculus Problems, then it is rather un-rigorous, has errors, and personally I hate the presentation with comic sans-like typeface and distracting pullouts instead having of clear top-to-bottom flow. Also, it is not exactly a problem book, more like a cheat sheet. $\endgroup$ – Rusty Core Feb 7 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ But Schaum's has a long history. $\endgroup$ – kcrisman Apr 18 at 12:15
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Other Calculus OER resources include:

I like the problems in Hoffman.

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