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I will be teaching a calculus-type course in Norwegian. Our textbook is unfortunately in English (the curse of a small language), but any custom exercises should be and all exams have to be in Norwegian; exams in both bokmål and nynorsk, actually.

Since the notations for (polynomial) long division seem to vary from country to country, I would like to know what is the notation used for long division of polynoms in Norway.

Wikipedia does not seem to have the relevant articles in Norwegian or even Danish, for that matter. Of culturally related Wikipedia articles I found:

What is the relevant notation in Norway?

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  • $\begingroup$ I am surprised that division of polynomials is a part of calculus course, not part of middle school course. $\endgroup$ – Rusty Core Apr 30 at 16:41
  • $\begingroup$ @RustyCore More typically, polynomial division is encountered in high school (secondary school) algebra. Some middle school students who qualify begin first year algebra while in middle school. (in the US, middle school describes the two or three years of study between "elementary school" and "high school/secondary school".) Of course, in "middle schools" or "junior high school" depending on school district in the US, they are either grades 6-8, 7-8, or 7-9. $\endgroup$ – Namaste Apr 30 at 17:13
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    $\begingroup$ @RustyCore I have no idea when the concept is first encountered, but it makes an appearance when integrating rational functions. (This course is mostly for students of the less mathematically involved subjects like biology, chemistry and geology; I do not know about the more mathematically involved course sequence.) $\endgroup$ – Tommi Brander Apr 30 at 17:38
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The fruitful search terms turn out to be "divisjon" and "polynomdivisjon". Both give several results on Youtube. This example includes both: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTfgvuuALBE

"dividering" seems to be another useful term for finding relevant content.

The notation seems similar to the notation in the German Wikipedia article.

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