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Want to ask if someone knows a official site where all kind of rules like $\infty-\infty$ or $\infty^0$ are classified. Ment an paper rule collector for that kind of definitions which has an certified character. ok wikipedia is also fine, but thats not that what i ment. in the IT sector you have RFC's similar to papers but an really uniqe form, because the RFC's are strict reglementated by an CA ietf.org. Exists in mathematic also an CA with that kind of strict reglementations? If yes which is it and where can i find all kind of rules which exists in mathematics in one place? And i dont ment wikipedia :D it's cool but still in progress to became an regular CA. thx

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to StackOverflow. However, your question is not clear, at least to me. For one thing, you use many abbreviations which not everyone will understand. Also, just what do you mean by "classified" or "definitions"? Please reword your question to be more clear and state your particular problem. $\endgroup$ – Rory Daulton Jun 19 '19 at 0:10
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    $\begingroup$ @RoryDaulton, you probably meant to say "Mathematics Educators Stack Exchange" instead of "StackOverflow." $\endgroup$ – Joel Reyes Noche Jun 19 '19 at 0:40
  • $\begingroup$ One standard that defines the results of some of the operations you mention is the IEEE Standard for Floating-Point Arithmetic. However, the actual document is not freely available; it must be purchased. $\endgroup$ – Joel Reyes Noche Jun 19 '19 at 0:42
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome! Unfortunately your question ended up closed. This is because it's unclear what you are looking for. Maybe you are hoping for a list of rules about what you are allowed to do with infinity. If you are looking specifically for a list of indeterminate forms like those found in a Calculus II course, you could ask about that specifically, but then it would be a mathematics question and not a math education question. I recommend you try to narrow down specifically what you are looking for, then if it is a question about mathematics, ask it at math.stackexchange.com. Cheers! $\endgroup$ – Chris Cunningham Jun 19 '19 at 1:44
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    $\begingroup$ I flagged one of your comments to me as "unfriendly or unkind." That's why it can no longer be seen. Please consider being more polite in the future. Instead of saying "ah dude. lern to read right before you post just some b---s--- please. other peoples could understand me and answers right," you could say "Thanks for the info, but it's not what I'm looking for." $\endgroup$ – Joel Reyes Noche Jun 19 '19 at 9:43
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The field of mathematics does not have a central regulatory board, like many computing platforms do (e.g., the IETF RFC's). Definitions of terms become standardized only through common use and consensus -- it is very common for different textbooks, papers, etc. to define the same term differently. There is no site for "official" definitions.

One example of an academic paper reflecting on this issue:

  • Gómez, Bernardo. "Historical conflicts and subtleties with the √ sign in textbooks." 6th European Summer University on the History and Epistemology in Mathematics Education. HPM: Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria (2010).
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    $\begingroup$ I removed several comments here; be excellent to each other. $\endgroup$ – Chris Cunningham Jun 21 '19 at 6:24

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