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Where could I find a list, and ideally discussion, of primary school mathematics schemes (textbook series) in common use in Australia and New Zealand in the period immediately following decimalization of their currencies in 1966, 1967 (say the next 10 or 15 years)? These may be with or without Imperial units of length, weight, etc.

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    $\begingroup$ Good luck. This sounds like a task for someone who knows how to use google really well. It might help to ask a local librarian (assuming you are in Australia or NZ). $\endgroup$
    – Sue VanHattum
    Dec 3 '20 at 19:20
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    $\begingroup$ @SueVanHattum I'm actually not in Australia or New Zealand. So far I've found that the series "Betty and Jim learn the new [$n$th] grade mathematics" seems to have had some popularity in Australia, but I don't know anything about its characteristics. I suspect there might also have been importation and/or adaptation of American books to meet immediate needs for books with dollars and cents. And I expect there might be reviews of books in The Australian Mathematics Teacher, but I don't have access to that journal or even to article titles from that period. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Dec 3 '20 at 20:08
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    $\begingroup$ That being said, the actual coins were for 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 cents versus 1, 5, 10, 25 cents in the U.S. So at the lowest levels some degree of adaptation would have been essential. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Dec 3 '20 at 20:21
  • $\begingroup$ A significant effect of the adoption of a decimal currency is often that decimal numbers might then tend to be taught before more general fractions. This might not have been the case with new editions of pre-decimal books. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Dec 3 '20 at 21:06
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    $\begingroup$ There's a partial list of articles here: albert.aamt.edu.au/Journals/Journals-Index but I'm not seeing many things that could be book reviews of primary textbooks. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Dec 3 '20 at 21:16

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