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What would one suggest for online math teaching to draw diagrams? Is Tikz or Matplotlib too slow for helping to visualize problems during the lesson?

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    $\begingroup$ A document camera, a blank piece of paper and a few color pens. Worked excellently for me during the COVID lockdown. $\endgroup$
    – fedja
    Jan 25, 2023 at 21:11
  • $\begingroup$ MS-Visio, MS-Powerpoint, ...? $\endgroup$
    – Dominique
    Jan 26, 2023 at 7:12

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Depends a lot on the kind of diagrams, and on the technology you are using to teach online.

When I teach online I use Zoom, and log in on two different devices: (a) a laptop, which captures my face and voice, and (b) an iPad, on which I have video and audio turned off by default, that I use for screensharing. I use the Notability app on my iPad as a "virtual chalkboard", and write and draw sketches on it as I would a physical chalkboard; I also will switch to other apps (e.g. Desmos or Geogebra) if I want a more precise and/or dynamic rendering of a particular diagram. I wouldn't dream of using Tikz for real-time presentations, although I suppose it might be reasonable to prepare some diagrams in Tikz ahead of time and paste them into my Notability document during the lecture if there was not another way to create them.

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    $\begingroup$ I do the same but I use goodnotes on my ipad. (And I love it.) $\endgroup$
    – Sue VanHattum
    Jan 25, 2023 at 22:39
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I use Geogebra for dynamic trigonometry or functions, and when drawing something by hand or doing calculations at the side of the drawing, Zoom whiteboard is okay. The whiteboards can be saved and afterwards I share them with the students, together with the recording.

I have a Microsoft tablet computer and a pen for it for the physical drawings.

A document camera would be at least as good and convenient, though maybe better for lecturing than teaching forms where the students also contribute.

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  • $\begingroup$ As for visualising graphs, the main issue is that you show a vertex, connect it with another vertex, and when you move the vertex the connection gets moved along. Is this possible with Zoom whiteboard? (It's surely not possible with MS-Paint) $\endgroup$
    – Dominique
    Jan 26, 2023 at 14:47
  • $\begingroup$ @Dominique for graphs (in the sense of "graph theory") you might find that a dynamic geometry tool like Geogebra is your best bet. $\endgroup$
    – mweiss
    Jan 26, 2023 at 23:10

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