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I'm competitive exam student learning Quantative aptitude what should i choose over solving more questions and skipping the one i can't solve or spending hours on one question till i solve it and then moving to next one.

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    $\begingroup$ This does not appear to be a question about math education. $\endgroup$
    – Sue VanHattum
    Sep 27, 2023 at 16:15
  • $\begingroup$ Quantative aptitude is a subject which contains variety of math topics you ,can search it on Google $\endgroup$
    – Abhishek
    Sep 27, 2023 at 18:08
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    $\begingroup$ Finding a curriculum appropriate to your current understanding is not a simple or easy task. ArtOfProblemSolving.com is popular for Competitive exams. I would pursue something which covers the relevant theory first, then introduces exercises and ultimately exam type questions. $\endgroup$
    – nickalh
    Sep 27, 2023 at 22:14
  • $\begingroup$ Please edit your question to include a summary of what quantitative aptitude is in your context. Quick duck-search suggests some kind of exam related to jobs at a bank or similar, but who knows if there exist many such in the world. $\endgroup$
    – Tommi
    Sep 28, 2023 at 7:00

2 Answers 2

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There is a “middle way” between sinking hours into a problem and skipping it completely. Spend a certain amount of time on the problem, document what you did and what your blockers were, and then seek feedback — either from an answer key, a teacher, a peer, or an online forum (like Math SE). If you document what you tried and where you’re struggling, you can more easily use the key to see where you went wrong and get a better reception to your question from a teacher or Math SE.

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If you're solving questions that are

  • so easy and familiar that solving them requires no thought, or
  • so difficult that you can't solve them or solving them requires hours of thought,

then that suggests the educational resources you are using for practice might not be scaffolded very well, and you may benefit from following a more highly scaffolded curriculum.

In order to give more specific recommendations regarding practice material, we'd need to know exactly what exam you're preparing for and what resources you are currently using to prepare for it.

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    $\begingroup$ Definition of Scaffolding: To clarify, "scaffolding" is a characteristic of math curriculum particularly for difficult concepts or when one concept builds on others. It might be the educators equivalent of training wheels. When first introduced to a problem type, there are often some ideas or concepts educators provide for the student intended to make learning the concept simpler. Then as the student progresses the problems no longer provide those "training wheels" or scaffolding. $\endgroup$
    – nickalh
    Sep 27, 2023 at 22:13

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