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Do you think having students turn in homework in $\LaTeX$ say for extra credit is helpful for them at the college level? At the high school level? There could also be a few assignments that have to be in $\LaTeX$.

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    $\begingroup$ See answers and comments to How should LaTeX be taught to university students? AND Should LaTeX be taught in high school? $\endgroup$ Jan 6 at 17:38
  • $\begingroup$ While I think that this is an interesting and useful discussion to have, it doesn't quite fit with the SE format, which expects that questions should have authoritative, objectively correct answers. There are some questions which are kind of borderline which may be acceptable (e.g. "How do you implement TeX instruction at the college level?"), but questions which ask for opinion-based discussion are generally off-topic. $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson
    Jan 7 at 12:14

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I would say that one should allow submitting homework, etc. in $\LaTeX$, perhaps, one can even go as far as encouraging it, but demanding it will be way overboard.

In my humble opinion, if your subject and class format do not strictly require working on a computer or knowing how to program, then there is no reason why you should assume that the students have either the equipment, or the necessary skills. If they can handle pen and paper, they should be already qualified to get into such a class assuming they have completed all necessary prerequisites. The new technology should give new opportunities, not enforce new restrictions. Whether to use those opportunities or not should be left to the user to choose.

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    $\begingroup$ In the US, I think it is absolutely fair to assume that students have access to the necessary equipment. I don't know that I have ever encountered an American institution of higher learning which does not have computer labs and libraries with computers for student use. Many institutions also have laptops which students can check out (either by the hour, or by the semester). And, presumably, the goal of assigning LaTeX'd homework is to teach them the skills they need (and learning the tech creates new opportunities). $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson
    Jan 7 at 12:07
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    $\begingroup$ I would also point out that there are a ton of students who show up on Math SE with zero TeX skill, and managed to figure out how to format their questions using only the rather terrible "crash course" which is provided on the meta. I don't think that the bar to entry here is all that high, and instructor provided templates plus Overleaf should make it quite accessible. I don't find your arguments very convincing... $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson
    Jan 7 at 12:09
  • $\begingroup$ @XanderHenderson "In the US, I think it is absolutely fair to assume that students have access to the necessary equipment." If you've read our discussion with Dominique (which is deleted now, probably for better), you should be able to see that some people might disagree with you here. As to "teaching $\LaTeX$ in the course", I strongly prefer to stay on teaching the course subject, though I have nothing against offering the students the optional $\LaTeX$ training in my and their free time and I've done such things (about something else that I thought would be useful) in the past :-) $\endgroup$
    – fedja
    Jan 7 at 13:09
  • $\begingroup$ @XanderHenderson And yeah, most mathematically inclined people can learn basic $\LaTeX$ in no time, but I have a friend in economics (quite a prominent guy in social choice theory), who is absolutely incapable of it (don't ask me why) and still uses scientific word (or something like that) instead. $\endgroup$
    – fedja
    Jan 7 at 13:13
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    $\begingroup$ I'm also curious to know how you would respond to a history instructor requiring that all student work be typed. If, as you say, students lack access or skill, is it unfair to demand that students turn in typed work? Is it unfair to expect a certain citation style in that typed work? Students are often very confused by different citation styles, and learning the "correct" style isn't the "course subject"---by your argument, history profs should accept hand-written work with whatever kind of citation students can muster. I don't know many history profs who would agree... $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson
    Jan 7 at 13:20
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In the Age of Information, but before the Age of AI, it seems like it would be very helpful for the students--especially since we have Overleaf and don't have to download a whole editor. Learning a neat type-setting language, maybe even some programming that could be helpful for future employment. Having a neat organized solution to a problem to read. The only problem is they can use ChatGPT, and while it is not great at math, it is great at programming, so it seems code can be copied. Though, prompting the $\LaTeX$ code would still be non-trivial as you must type in your solution for ChatGPT and there will still be several follow-ups.

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