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The first high school I went to I did Integrated Math 1 my Freshman year, Integrated 2 my Sophomore year, and Integrated 3 my junior year. My junior year I transferred to a continuation school where I was told I no longer needed to continue math classes since I did 3 years at my previous High School. I continued with my junior year and Senior year at this continuation school but did not end up graduating due to insufficient credits on my end. The next year I started Adult education where they helped build my classes and schedule and specifically told me I do not need math since I finished at my first high school. I am now starting my second semester at this adult education, where I have to set up new classes. The lady helping me out now tells me I need 9 credits in math, which I was confused and told her I finished 3 years of math so I should be good. She told me Integrated math is ONLY Algebra, but I need general mathematics. Is she right? I tried to do some research but I don’t really know where to go, I thought integrated math was just general math not only algebra is taught. It leaves me to wonder why my first high school only had me in Algebra classes for 3 years if I needed mathematics to graduate?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to ME.SE! The answers depend on the educational system you are in and I do not know if they depend on the particular school or country or what. Could you specify at least the country you are in? $\endgroup$
    – Tommi
    Commented Jan 27 at 13:25
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    $\begingroup$ Is the "lady helping me out" a staff member, a teacher, a fellow a student, or someone else? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 27 at 14:44
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    $\begingroup$ What state you're in might be helpful too. I do think this last person was wrong. $\endgroup$
    – Sue VanHattum
    Commented Jan 27 at 17:42
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    $\begingroup$ Also, something called 'general mathematics' often indicates a course below the level of algebra. $\endgroup$
    – Sue VanHattum
    Commented Jan 27 at 17:49
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    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because the correct answer has nothing to do with mathematics education and everything to do with how to handle yourself in a bureaucracy when there are multiple agencies and people involved. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 29 at 1:51

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Integrated mathematics means a connected mixture of topics, not just algebra. Wikipedia says:

Integrated mathematics is the term used in the United States to describe the style of mathematics education which integrates many topics or strands of mathematics throughout each year of secondary school. Each math course in secondary school covers topics in algebra, geometry, trigonometry and functions. Nearly all countries throughout the world, except the United States, follow this type of curriculum.

In the United States, topics are usually integrated throughout elementary school up to the seventh or sometimes eighth grade. Beginning with high school level courses, topics are usually separated so that one year a student focuses entirely on algebra (if it was not already taken in the eighth grade), the next year entirely on geometry, then another year of algebra (sometimes with trigonometry), and later an optional fourth year of precalculus or calculus. Precalculus is the exception to the rule, as it usually integrates algebra, trigonometry, and geometry topics. Statistics may be integrated into all the courses or presented as a separate course.

That said, the OP's primary problem sounds more administrative than math education (contradictory claims from intake to current time). Given the above, it sounds like the "lady helping me out now" is the one more likely to be mistaken, and should be joined in a meeting or conference call with the person or office who set the initial schedule to straighten things out.

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