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We are in the process of restructuring our math lectures to a more modern style. For that we want to use some math tools to show students how math is done in a more current state. Our math is more engineering focused, more precisely electrical engineering and mechatronical engineering. The goal is to extend the knowledge from a theoretical lecture with the tools for more complex problems (i.e. teach the more simple differential equations in the theoretical part and show the higher grade ones with the tools)

We haven't fixed the exact tools yet and have collected the following:

  • Matlab/Simulink
  • Maple
  • Python
  • Mathematica

Do you folks know other good tools to use for the lectures?

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3 Answers 3

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If you're looking into Python, SageMath (https://www.sagemath.org/) is free and gathers together a bunch of open source mathematics libraries in Python to produce something comparable to Mathematica.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good call, thank you. During our research Sage also popped up and i does look very promising to use for the lecture. Thank you $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 12:14
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    $\begingroup$ It has the advantage that people can continue to use it even after they graduate and their institutional license is expired. $\endgroup$ Apr 20 at 23:38
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I'm an enthousiast user of Geogebra, to be found under this URL.

It can be used for making drawings of equations, geometrical constructions, both can even be combined.

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    $\begingroup$ Geogebra is something we also want to consider now since geomtrical representations and drawings of equations is quite nice and easy in this tool. Thanks $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 12:14
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You might consider the Julia programming language, designed with engineering and scientific computing in mind. It has a particularly strong differential equations package, for instance.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the hint. As promising as Julia seems, i think it is a bit much for the first iteration of the lecture. $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 12:12

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