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I've been searching for a repository or a database with math problems (K-12 levels) written in LaTeX, but with no luck. Neither in Spanish (my student's language) nor in English. But I bet this is something someone must have done before.

There are things like mathmaster.org where you can download pdf worksheets. Indeed, mathmaster uses LaTex as a backend, but users can just download the final pdf (apart from this technical detail, mathmaster is a great resource).

Anyone knows about such LaTeX repository? Does it exist?

And if there is no LaTeX... Is there any open source repo of any kind?

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  • $\begingroup$ Assume you're familiar with ck12.org ? $\endgroup$ – Barry Carter Oct 30 '14 at 0:25
  • $\begingroup$ I know it. It's also a great resource. Last week I translated a couple of concepts there. But when it comes to prepare worksheets or tests, the idea of a exercises and problems repo is a bit different. And if they are in LaTeX, even better. In other words, in ck12 you could collect the exercises from the different concepts and resources. But some of them are uploaded as doc, other as pdf, others as flashcards,... Inside the concepts you can find exercises written in LaTeX, but to get the code you must enter the LaTeX editor and copy, one by one. $\endgroup$ – Pablo B. Oct 30 '14 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ I'm pretty sure there is more than one teacher out there that have prepared such a repo for personal use. Other way, LaTeX packages for managing exercises databases wouldn't have any sense. $\endgroup$ – Pablo B. Oct 30 '14 at 8:38
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with @PabloB., that you are most likely to find teachers with personal repositories. Personally, I have a small, but growing LaTeX repository that covers Precalculus through Differential Equations. I'd be happy to send you copies. $\endgroup$ – HTG Nov 6 '14 at 4:27
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I have created a website of public domain mathematics teaching materials. Most of the material is in the K-12 range. (I have been developing these materials since the late 1970’s.) The address is: http://www.public-domain-materials.com/

One of the items in my website is autocorrected exercises in proving theorems: http://www.public-domain-materials.com/folder-student-exercise-tasks-for-mathematics-language-arts-etc---autocorrected.html

The materials are more “open” than “open source”, since they are in the public domain. You can use the materials, in whole or in part, for any purpose whatsoever, including commercial purposes, without notifying me or even acknowledging source. It is just as if you yourself had written the materials, except that you cannot restrict anyone else’s use of the materials.

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