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Teaching is a social activity and very sensitive to any change in social parameters. Even the simplest acts of a teacher could cause some positive/negative reactions of students and conversely. Each one of us has his own personal experiences in possible good and bad teaching styles and we are sharing them here in the forum. It is very helpful for us. Also the scientific analysis of the academic teaching done by professional sociologists and psychologists could be very useful too.

Question. What are good references for researches about the best teaching styles done by psychologists/sociologists?

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closed as too broad by Brian Rushton, Markus Klein, András Bátkai, user173, vonbrand Mar 25 '14 at 1:33

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ It looks like this question is too broad a topic fro this site. You might consider some of these tips for asking a more focused question. $\endgroup$ – Jon Ericson Mar 25 '14 at 18:47
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Here is a link to the new (free) e-book Applying Science of Learning in Education: Infusing Psychological Science Into the Curriculum, edited by Victor A. Benassi, Catherine E. Overson, and Christopher M. Hakala, which I haven't read yet but intend to.

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  • $\begingroup$ Very nice reference. Thanks for your guidance. $\endgroup$ – user230 Mar 24 '14 at 11:49
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The National Research Council has two (free!) books that are worth checking out.

  1. "How People Learn"
  2. "How Students Learn: Mathematics in the Classroom"

I'd also recommend going beyond what psychologists and sociologists have found about teaching math. Psychologists especially are going to end up with somewhat reductive pictures, and a human activity as complex as learning or teaching also benefits from a holistic approach. There's some excellent research done, for instance, on how students learn relatively elementary concepts such as fractions and multiplication. I am a huge fan of the "Cognitively Guided Instruction" series, personally.

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