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What the title says. I got my degree in math last year and now I'm working on a master's independent study project through my education department finding math tasks for K-12 curriculum aligned with the common core standards. These could be tasks out of textbooks, online resources, games, apps, whatever. Specifically, I'm looking for 8th grade tasks, but anything will help!

Here is two resources that I have (I can't post my entire list right now because I just made an account here and am restricted to 2 links until I get 10 reputation)

NCTM

Stanford Education

Also if you have any recommendations on textbooks, that would be great! Right now I'm just trying to gather as many resources as possible to start analyzing.

Thank you!


edit: now that I have more than 10 reputation, here's my complete list:

Dan Meyer's 3-act math tasks

MARS - Mathematics Assessment Resource Service

NCTM

Stanford Education

And I posted this question to reddit.com/r/math earlier and got these resources from sjhatters:

Everything Make an account. It's a goldmine.

Start of the day

Worksheets

Everything

Everything

Interesting problems

Worksheets

Exam solutions

Everything

Everything

Vids

Vids

Some are UK specific.

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    $\begingroup$ add this to your list, from the franklin institute learn.fi.edu/school/math2 $\endgroup$ – celeriko Feb 12 '15 at 23:39
  • $\begingroup$ For online graphing tasks that look very different from the Khan Academy link you posted, see Desmos Classroom Activities. $\endgroup$ – Xi Yu Feb 13 '15 at 11:51
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    $\begingroup$ To the community: should we have a big-list tag for questions like this? And, should this question be community-wiki? $\endgroup$ – benblumsmith Feb 18 '15 at 12:17
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    $\begingroup$ @BenjaminDickman - oop it seems it's already been asked!: meta.matheducators.stackexchange.com/questions/74/… $\endgroup$ – benblumsmith Feb 21 '15 at 17:04
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    $\begingroup$ You might also want to think about what makes a good task, like, what will be your inclusion/exclusion criteria? As opposed to just including every problem that has ever been designed for 8th graders... $\endgroup$ – James S. Feb 24 '15 at 12:32
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great question, beat me to a lot of great resources! while it is broad i think that it is good to try and have a collection of sources for math tasks as this is what secondary math teachers end up spending most of their time doing. I know that you are requesting actual tasks for your study but I will also touch upon creating tasks for fellow teachers who may read this and are trying to figure out good ways to efficiently make tasks. I tried to go more for categories of sites that you can find more of easily with a google search, rather than just posting links that may need to be updated in the future. I will post my most immediate list and update it as I find new sources or new sources are brought to my attention.

  1. Check your or other school districts or state education departments websites for resources, anchors, benchmarks etc. Here are links to the PA assessment anchors which surprisingly have some pretty good tasks. Also check for university and school websites, there are often class pages or archives that have all types of tasks

  2. The textbook that your school uses or any other text book and its supplementary material. For Geometry we use Discovering Geometry, Algebra uses Holt, pre-calc we use Pre-Calculus Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic (only math classes we offer :(. Many of the tasks that I use are adapted or sometimes taken directly from the supplementary material provided by these textbooks.

  3. Math circle or other math club or organization websites generally have an archive or sampling of some sort and can give good ideas for out of the box lessons. Here is the Los Angeles Math Circle archive, so full of great tasks and lessons!

  4. Depending on the type of task that you are trying to create, Kuta Software may be helpful. It allows you to pick the type of problem that you would like to create and offers a ton of options for each problem type and then generates questions on the fly. It does not pull from a database so the questions are "guaranteed" to be unique. I really like it for quick and dirty practice problem sheets either as a quick quiz or for homework. It does cost money but they do offer two week trials of the full version for you to test out. Does not create word problems but it does allow you to create your own questions so you can still use it to make assessments.

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For teaching CCSS Mathematical Practice Standards:

1. Five Triangles

Though advertised as problems for grades 6 through 8, many of their problems are appropriate for high schoolers, too. From their About page:

Five Triangles shares a philosophy of mathematics education that favours concise, unambiguous, and calibrated problems that lend themselves to a variety of approaches, with the additional condition that, throughout the solution process, cognitive stress should be maintained.

In my secondary geometry class, we spent a good 20 minutes thinking about their "2. Odd quad" problem and ended up discussing what it means to have "insight" in problem solving:

                                        enter image description here


2. Balanced Assessment

Though no longer updated, this resource is a treasure trove of longer performance assessment tasks with suggested scoring guides. I am fond of their "–Ness" tasks for teaching mathematical modeling. Here is an excerpt from their "Square-Ness" task:

Balanced Assessment: "Square-Ness"


3. MathArguments180.com

This is a collection of quick ideas from the internet for starting discussions or "arguments" in the classroom. The posts vary in readiness for use, and many times, they are just a perplexing image for students to talk about.

In this same short-form presentation of task ideas, I recommend:

  • Estimation180, which presents a photo, and students take a guess
  • Visual Patterns, which gives Stages 1–3, and students have to find Stage 43

4. Play With Your Math

This one is a poster series that a few colleagues and I started at our high school. We find problems that have "play potential" and try to present them in a more visual format in hopes to lower the barrier to entry. Here is an example of our design for a MathArguments180 problem.

                                         Play With Your Math: "1. Split 25"

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  • $\begingroup$ Wow these are great, thank you so much! Looks like I have a lot of weekend reading to do. Are there solutions available for Play With Your Math? $\endgroup$ – Wmol Feb 13 '15 at 6:20
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    $\begingroup$ Ah! Of course, I'd first encourage you to play with these yourself! (And you definitely don't need to know the solutions to present these to the kids!) But if you absolutely want a few spoilers, my colleague blogs about these problems here. If you have a specific question about a problem, or if you want the original InDesign files to edit for yourself, I can be reached at the email listed on the website's contact page. $\endgroup$ – Xi Yu Feb 13 '15 at 11:40
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you so much! Yeah I worked on a few of them and they were really fun. Great resource. $\endgroup$ – Wmol Feb 16 '15 at 7:04
  • $\begingroup$ Sadly, the excellent Five Triangles site seems to be a closed site now. $\endgroup$ – Sue VanHattum Nov 10 '15 at 2:32
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I don't think you had this one: RISPS

I'll try to post more later...

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Here is another resource, very tailored to the Common Core State Standards: Illustrative Mathematics

This site is the brainchild of Bill McCallum, one of the lead authors of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. The idea is to be a catalogue of tasks that are aligned to the individual standards and "illustrate" the types of ideas and skills that the standards are aiming for. The site has a review process wherein the tasks are vetted by both educators and mathematicians.

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Check out the British Columbia Association of Math Teachers Rich Task List.

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I like to use some tasks from EngageNY. Also, I like to use The Mathematics Vision Project materials on occasion.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site! Could you explain a bit more why you like those resources. You can edit your post to include more information. $\endgroup$ – quid Feb 15 '15 at 13:53

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