Questions tagged [terminology]

How words are used in mathematics or mathematics education

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22
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16answers
2k views

Examples of Mathematical Slang

Unless you have taught highschool algebra in Iran, you could not make sense of the phrase: Elephant and Teacup Identity! This is what teachers use to refer to the following identities: $ (a+b)(a^2-...
0
votes
6answers
459 views

Is there a more telling name for “Calculus 2”?

I see a lot of places where "Calculus 1" is referred to as "Introduction to Calculus", or "Single-variable Calculus." "Calculus 3" is referred to as "Multiple-variable calculus." Is there an ...
5
votes
4answers
207 views

What is the value in creating distinguishing terminology between the $x$, $y$, and $(x, y)$ values of a possible point of extremum?

I've been out of a math program for about four years now. My wife is starting a CS degree, and finished her first calculus course last semester. I tutored calculus throughout my entire undergrad, ...
15
votes
1answer
687 views

Where does the word “roots” come from when talking about zeros

We often use the word roots when referring to the solutions of an equation. For instance, when we have a polynomial $P(x)$, we call its zeros the roots of $P(x)$. For some polynomials we can relate ...
12
votes
5answers
417 views

What is a recommend way to describe a negative number with large absolute value?

Sometimes when we discuss limits verbally, we may say that a variable $x$ being "very small" (assuming that $x$ is a real number). But this could mean any one of the following: The number $x$ is a ...
8
votes
3answers
424 views

“Amplitude” of Tan and Cot functions

The amplitude of a sinusoid is the distance from its axis to a high point or a low point. When we read this, it follows that Tan and Cot don't have an amplitude. Nor do SEC or CSC. Now, I'm in an ...
8
votes
1answer
431 views

Standard word for a formula that is always true

If it is known from context that variables $x$ and $y$ represent integers, an open Boolean formula such as $x \ge y \Rightarrow x+1 > y$ evaluates to true regardless of the value assigned to ...