Questions tagged [terminology]

How words are used in mathematics or mathematics education

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6
votes
2answers
235 views

Name to use for codomain/range/target

There are many questions about how best to teach functions, for example why don't we teach codomains in HS and should we teach them at all. On Math.SX there are questions about the "right" name for ...
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3answers
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Mathematical education slang

Amir Asghari recently asked a question about mathematical slang. He was "looking for "non-mathematical" terms or phrases that are used to refer to mathematical objects (of any kind) mainly for ...
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16answers
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Examples of Mathematical Slang

Unless you have taught highschool algebra in Iran, you could not make sense of the phrase: Elephant and Teacup Identity! This is what teachers use to refer to the following identities: $ (a+b)(a^2-...
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2answers
191 views

Alternative terms for 'mathematical understanding'

When I talk to other research mathematicians, there is pretty uniform agreement that we want our (university) students to understand the maths we teach them rather than just memorise processes. As far ...
9
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1answer
242 views

When did the term and taught technique 'cross multiplication' enter into common use?

The title says it all, I suppose. I'm interested to know when/where the term/technique cross multiply came into use. Sources would be nice. In case it's unfamiliar to anyone, or in case the usage of ...
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12answers
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What could be good non-mathematical analogies to explain the difference between the words theorem, proposition, lemma and corollaries?

What could be good non-mathematical analogy/analogies to explain the difference among the words - theorem, proposition, lemma and corollaries to high school students? I am looking for analogies that ...
6
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1answer
250 views

What is a less anglo-centric collection of persons than Andy, Beth, Carl, Debby and Earl?

These five imagined persons have accompanied me for some time. We've had a bunch of laughs and a few tears. I love them dearly. That said, I'd like to retire them in favor of a more culturally diverse ...
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4answers
1k views

Correct pronunciation of 'xth' (and workarounds for those who find it a tongue-twister)

This is to some extent a cross-posting from English Language & Usage. How do you pronounce “xth”? I am asking a slightly different question -- but only slightly. I was attempting to offer ways ...
4
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1answer
252 views

Definition of “curriculum”

In standard usage does the word "curriculum" mean That which ought to be taught and learned, as prescribed by authorities (i.e. teachers and textbook authors and the like); or That which actually is ...
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3answers
761 views

Difference in meaning of 'algebra'

The other day, in a conversation with colleagues, I realised that the word 'algebra' means different things to us. To me, it brings to mind the study of algebraic structures: vector spaces, groups, ...
11
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2answers
267 views

Does “factor” mean simply the multiplication (of any functions, numbers etc)

I am sorry I am not directed with the education of math. But granted, let me ask the above question. In my language (actually Japanese), the words corresponding with the factor and divisor, seem to ...
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0answers
178 views

Is there a name for 'simple' two-input-one-output word problems?

Andy has 4 apples, and then eats 2. How many does he have left? Beth drives for 3 hours at 80 km/h. How far did she go? Carl, Debbie and Earl earned $30 together shoveling driveways. How much does ...
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1answer
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Metonymy in mathematics

Metonymy is a figure of speech where a word or another expression is used to mean something other than its literal meaning. This phenomenon is not restricted to the "usual human languages" (such as ...
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1answer
717 views

Where does the word “roots” come from when talking about zeros

We often use the word roots when referring to the solutions of an equation. For instance, when we have a polynomial $P(x)$, we call its zeros the roots of $P(x)$. For some polynomials we can relate ...
10
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2answers
216 views

Using terminology for the different concepts of rational number

In elementary maths education literature, they distinguish multiple concepts that rational numbers are used to represent: fractions, quotients, ratios, rates, and possibly more. These words seem to be ...
10
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2answers
313 views

Term and reference for the problem of students “overassociating” concepts with each other

I am writing a paper directed at a physics-education journal and I want to briefly refer to the phenomenon of students “overassociating” (in lack of a better term) mathematical concepts with each ...
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3answers
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“Proof” meaning in maths and society

When we ask students to prove a particular result in a math class, students often reply with examples. For example, if I state: if a number is even its square will be even, and ask the students to ...
11
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3answers
430 views

Common phrases having different meaning

When talking with students it frequently happens that they misunderstand what you meant. The common example is the amount of rigor that one would consider "a proof", but there are other things, like ...
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7answers
1k views

The word “and” rather than “or”

I asked my students the following question. Q: Express $\cos(\pi+x)$ in terms of $\sin$ and $\cos$. A: $-\cos(x)$. Students: Yeah, but where is the $\sin$ part? If I got this in an exam then I'd ...
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5answers
4k views

What is the proper verb for “doing” an integral?

It's time to write exams, and when writing in committee we often discover differences in usage between various instructors. Here's an example I noticed today. What is the proper verb to use in a ...
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11answers
4k views

Are the words “easy,” “basic,” “clearly,” “obviously,” etc., ever helpful?

This is a very basic fact from... It then clearly follows that... Obviously, we have... The proof is trivial... I could add plenty of other phrases to this list that mathematicians are prone to use ...
9
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1answer
651 views

Standard word for a formula that is always true

If it is known from context that variables $x$ and $y$ represent integers, an open Boolean formula such as $x \ge y \Rightarrow x+1 > y$ evaluates to true regardless of the value assigned to ...

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