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21 votes
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Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

I view a course as a story. The definitions introduce the characters, the theorems are the plot, and hopefully there is some sort of overarching message that plot is trying to convey. If you were ...
Steven Gubkin's user avatar
18 votes

Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

No matter how large or small the effect, if the mistake was caught by a student, I would never lower grades because of this. It would discourage students from pointing out mistakes. Take out any ...
Sue VanHattum's user avatar
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15 votes
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Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

I would go with option 1, give everybody the points. But also, for the students who actually got it right, I would give them +1/40 bonus points so as not to annoy/upset them either. Basically, I don't ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
11 votes

Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

I think everybody who got the question "right" but was misgraded should have their score adjusted upwards. But everybody who got the question "wrong" should get the benefit of the ...
Jeff Silverman's user avatar
9 votes
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Strategies for Fair Assessment in Mixed-Ability Undergraduate Math Classes

This is essentially not a problem that a single instructor can solve on their own. The current top pedagogical theory in these cases is to provide "corequisite" or some kind of outside ...
Daniel R. Collins's user avatar
9 votes

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

As a first intuition, I would rather ask for a proof of a special case or a different case; something which asks for some level of understanding (of what to alter), not only copying and pasting. It ...
Tommi's user avatar
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8 votes

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

I used to often ask questions of the form "State and prove Theorem X" in proof-based courses. My hope was that, instead of memorizing verbatim, students would boil the proof down to a few ...
user1149748's user avatar
6 votes

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

You will never be sure that the students really grasp a proof, if they can not express it or at least its essential part in there own words. Knowing proof really helps them to understand, what they do....
trula's user avatar
  • 449
6 votes

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

If you're training musicians, you might have them do exercises in 2 different categories: improvising from scratch in real time, on the spot, without prior rehearsal rehearsing and analyzing ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
4 votes

Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

I misread the statement and graded it mistakenly, as most of the students taking the exam did. Why should you assert that a statement where you and the students agreed on the meaning of the statement ...
david's user avatar
  • 151
3 votes

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

I vote yes, do it. If you want them to know the proofs (and you do), demonstrated recall will help assure that it happens. I think your hesitancy to have students duplicate work, and do something new ...
guest troll's user avatar
3 votes

Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

I believe it is important to have a policy that grades are not adjusted downward for grading mistakes. I have experiences with two universities each with the opposite policy. In the first the grades ...
Kvothe's user avatar
  • 131
2 votes

Would you correct grading mistakes downwards if there is a mistake in grading?

I would ask the students. If I make a mistake in grading, do you want the mistaken grade to stand - whether it is to your advantage or not, or do you want it to be corrected, whether it is to your ...
Nullius in Verba's user avatar
1 vote

How to assess students in real analysis?

I suspect that the rules of assessment are the same for every discipline, calculus not excluded, and can be just derived from first principles and your particular version of common sense without any ...
fedja's user avatar
  • 3,869
1 vote

Understanding common multiples

I think you make it more difficult for students by introducing the "multiples" not as multiples, but by continual adding, also since 77*63 is an easy solution you are not going in the ...
trula's user avatar
  • 449
1 vote

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

Allow me to add an answer from a student's perspective (many many years ago). In high school my maths marks were pretty mediocre, not bad enough to bar me from college, but still. Proofs were always ...
frIT's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

Asking students to reproduce proofs can be very effective. The degree of effectiveness is largely determined by how you ask students to do it. As this answer describes, some reproduction tasks can ...
Justin Hancock's user avatar
1 vote

Effectiveness of Requiring Students to Repeat Proofs Presented in Class

I want to emphasize an alternative approach mentioned by Tommi: I would rather ask for a proof of a special case or a different case; something which asks for some level of understanding (of what to ...
user21820's user avatar
  • 2,649

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