56

I'm a LaTeX user, but I'll stake out a devil's advocate position against this proposal. Reasons: Quality of mathematical thinking neither causes nor results from using a certain piece of software. Tech ed belongs in tech ed. K-12 education should mainly be about enriching people's intellectual lives and creating the level of education that makes it possible ...


28

This is not an answer to the posed question, but only an anecdote. This semester, teaching US college students (Discrete & Computational Geometry), I prepared all my assignments in LaTeX, and made available a .zip file of the .tex, .bbl, .bib, Figure/ directory constituting the assignment. Students could submit assignment answers in any form—from ...


16

Here's my advice. I have no teaching experience. Remedy that first before you lay out plans for a 6-month course of study. Find some way where you can teach just for a single day in some way at the high school that you're targeting. After that, find some way where you can teach for a week (i.e., say, 4 interlinked days). I'd suggest that you restart your ...


15

I don't think it should be a base skill for students in general. Have held jobs in engineering, chemistry, military, and finance and never needed it. Nor did my colleagues. Didn't need it for a thesis or science papers either. Just MS Word was fine. (I think I did enable the MSFT equation editor since it helps with typesetting sub and super scripts on ...


11

This is clearly an opinion based question. I will answer based on my experience and opinion. No, LaTeX should not be taught at high school. It is a skill that is costly to learn with essentially no benefit at high school level. Even at college level, it is not particularly useful. Homeworks are typically submitted handwritten which works perfectly fine. And ...


10

Regarding "How do I recruit students:" You should start here -- you have started with this cool thing you want to do, and are wondering how to do it. But you should instead try to find some of these students first. What do they want? Where are they? If you have a core of 1-2 excited parents and 2-3 excited students, then you can start planning. I ...


9

I only want to give anecdotical advice since I happened to have been taught LaTeX in regular school (10th grade in the German system, iirc). However, I attended a school with a MINT focus and especially maths, also this was not part of the actual curriculum but the teacher "showed" us LaTeX and the interested students that we were promptly picked it up. And ...


7

I’d like to give you some ideas, based on my own musings about starting a math club, of what to teach instead of Lang and Axler. You say you want to attract motivated, hardworking students, but that’s not necessarily equivalent to “mathematically mature” students. They will have gaps in their knowledge, and as Daniel Collins said--and I can attest to--you ...


6

I think this is an interesting question. In the US undergraduate mathematics curriculum, one often finds a sequence of courses "Abstract Algebra I" and "Abstract Algebra II." I think there is lots of variation. Typically groups are in the first course, but Sylow theorems might be in the second course, along with rings. And the second ...


6

No, teach Markdown Separation of content This and future generations of students should learn to separate content from formatting. IT professionals have been very successful in applying this concept for over a decade. However, absent marketing and strong commercial interests have kept wider audiences from applying this very useful principle. Focusing on ...


5

I'd suggest exposing students to LaTeX, perhaps by having them doing a assignment/project with it, perhaps in a group, but not requiring them to learn much about it. This would seem to have several advantages: It gives students an idea of a tool that they might later use. It increases their understanding of what's out there, broadening their general ...


4

You should know the assigned text perfectly. Read it. Drilled it. Four dot oh. Don't ignore it. After all, it was designed to mesh with the drill problems in it. And if you have the choice, assign a structured text with good explanations, and drill problems. NOT the approach of some liberal arts topic where you just opine on things and assign a bunch ...


4

Dave from Boyinaband had a song about all the stuff he found useless in school. While I disagree with some particular things, his opinion in general is right. There are too many things taught that aren't needed by most students. Latex might be good for maths professors. How many people go to that field? Not a lot. Those who go there can learn Latex easily (...


4

First, LaTeX is a markup language and should be taught as such; trying to use it as a programming language would be an exercise in frustration. Second, I believe that all HS students should learn a markup language as an alternative to WYSIAYG. Third, while I routinely use LaTeX both for papers and for short documents, I am not convinced that it is suitable ...


4

Addressing the point about the course not being sufficiently connected to applications, you might be interested in Boyd & Vandenberghe's recent Introduction to Applied Linear Algebra: Vectors, Matrices, and Least Squares (VMLS). The book is available for free online, with permission from the publisher. It includes numerous applications, some of them from ...


4

I'm sorry, but like many commenters I do think your plan is far far too ambitious. Going over that material (I only know about Lang and Axler personally) will not give students any motivation for the extremely abstract concepts, and I think motivation is crucial, especially at the high school level. At best, you will teach them this abstract math and they ...


4

The idea as you've outlined just doesn't sound like a math club. I would start by first asking yourself what it is that you want to achieve. Just some possibilities, are you looking to: Encourage more local high school students to pursue math/see the beauty in it? Give kids who are already into math a rigorous outlet? Promote logical thinking in general? Or ...


4

Group theory has lots of applications in the sciences, such as to crystallography and quantum mechanics. Rings and fields basically don't, except in trivial ways like doing linear algebra over the complex numbers rather than the reals. I assume that's the reason why the curriculum is normally arranged the way it is, so that STEM students have the option of ...


3

This sounds like a super interesting course - but I'm inclined to agree with the other answers here, it's a lot. As Daniel Collins and Thierry pointed out, there are some things about how students think that are hard to anticipate before you've spent some time teaching. I've had some similar difficult experiences myself - the first time I tried to teach a ...


3

I think this certainly makes a lot more sense than teaching rings before groups. I think it might be a wash whether you teach all of the parts of groups and then all of the parts of rings and note the similarities along the way or if you collate them like this book does, but at least this seems pedagogically viable. I think my larger concern is how the ...


3

Here are projects I have written and used. I assign these to student groups of 3-6 students, mostly Engineering majors, mostly sophomores. In class time is about 30 minutes per project to introduce the set up; then they work out of class for about 2 weeks per project (and come to office hours frequently during that time). Linear programming Camera matrices ...


2

"So, i am open to interesting ideas and/or references." More in the idea realm than the "everything you asked for", but take a look at petroleum economics. Especially useful if you are in a petroleum producing country. Ref1: http://investors.clr.com/presentations (open the MAR2018 presentation): pages 15 and 17 show a simple optimization problem. You ...


2

My feeling is LaTeX could be part of a very gentle introduction to computer programming. Maybe. Or it could be taught by a math instructor if the students have already seen HTML. Otherwise there are plenty of other things that could be taught in its place. Suppose you want to very slowly work up to coding -- like "AP Programming Principles" does. Learning ...


2

I suspect that PowerPoint is used, as explained in this video.


2

One of my favorite resources has been the shell center’s mathematics assessment project. They have both lessons and more traditional assessment scenarios, however the rubrics provided focus on ways to give formative feedback rather than a strictly point based approach. https://www.map.mathshell.org/


1

I agree with many others here that your plan in its current form is overly ambitious. I will not repeat the excellent advice given so far, but I will add that one way to attract interest and bring things down to earth would be to use or even focus on concrete applications of abstract algebra. Students may enjoy learning about secret sharing, secret codes and ...


1

I worked with Jim Fowler and Bart Snapp on Ximera as a graduate student. It is still (to my knowledge) primarily being maintained by Jim Fowler. I would recommend contacting him at his Ohio State email address. I am not sure if this is the case, but one design issue we ran into with randomization is how frequently edge cases come up, and the wide ...


1

Identify what you want you'd like to teach the students for the class. Maybe more importantly, identify the goals of the course. What do you want the students to know and what do you want them to be able to do once the course is over? Write up a reasonable calendar for the course. Put the lessons you want to give in a reasonable order and designate which ...


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