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7

Your last para was very reasonable. (I was going to give a mean sarcastic answer, but can't now.) We can crowdsource this: Frank Ayres, First Year College Math (algebra 1 to precalc; Schaum's Outline) 1958 but still in print: Only has geometric mean of 2 objects, but does spend quite a lot of time on geometric progressions. And also discusses getting ...


0

Yes they do so in many places, I think the point is that the students are forced to finish a certain curriculum (depends on the country ofcourse), for example when students finish the $9^{th}$ grade they must know this and this and that. So in the years before the $9^{th}$ grade the teachers focus on what have to be finished and leave the other topics that ...


1

My sense is that often authors are encouraged (required?) by publishers to make books very 'complete'. This means the book has all the topics that any instructor would be likely to want for a subject. However, it also means that books are often too big to entirely cover in a semester (or year). Thus an instructor must pick and choose chapters/sections ...


1

I tend to see this in upper level college courses a lot. My impression is that the schools are trying to appear to have a solid course by using an iconic textbook (not often the best pedagogically). Often the course is too short to really cover the content properly. I don't like the practice. Prefer to spend more time or more realistically, use a book ...


0

Here in Chile, at UTFSM in the '70 we had: Cálculo I: Sequences, limits, derivatives (the whole $\epsilon - \delta$ dance) Cálculo II: Integrals (Riemann), integration techniques. Taylor series. Cálculo III: Multiple variables. Taylor theorem, line integrals, Green's theorem, vector calculus (rudiments) We also had a first semester class called Álgebra, ...


2

Calculus 1 is Differential Calculus. You start off by learning how to find limits of Algebraic functions, then you learn how to derive every function you learned in High School Algebra. Calculus 2 is Integral Calculus. You learn how to find the area under a curve and between two curves, which are solved using integrals. You will also learn the various ...


7

The course titles "Calculus 1", "Calculus 2", etc. are not meaningful terms outside of the specific institutions where there are courses with these titles. These are names of classes, and not some internationally decided-upon list of topics or curriculum. The actual content of a class called "Calculus 1" might vary quite a lot from one institution to ...


1

If Calculus 2 means second-semester calculus to you, then call it second-semester calculus. If Calculus 2 means multivariable calculus to you, then call it multivariable calculus.


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When I was an undergrad, I feel like our Calc 2 was “Multivariable Calculus”, and Calc 3 was “Vector Calculus”. In Calc 1, we covered limits and the limit definitions for differentiation and integration, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. In Calc 2, we covered multivariable calculus, such as implicit differentiation, and integrals in $\mathbb{R}^2$ ...


16

In my job, I evaluate university math courses for transfer equivalency on a regular basis. In the US, "Calculus 1" typically refers to single variable differential calculus up to the fundamental theorem of calculus. So the course includes limits, the definition of the derivative, techniques and applications of the derivative including trigonometric and ...


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