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1

Are proofs still part of the geometry curriculum? (Some of my math colleagues have mentioned they've been downplayed over the last decade or so.) A good Chemistry answer looks an awful lot like a good proof; same sort of logic flow. (As does a good programming solution, if you're looking for another connection.) It might be a bit simple, but you could ...


6

Pick your battles. Don't expect to have synergy in every place. But where you do have synergy, exploit that, call it a win, and move on. Concentrate on the partial fullness of the glass, not the partial emptyness. For that matter, you don't have time to totally redesign each course from the ground up in a way new to man. Nor do you want to screw up the ...


4

This is perhaps more molecular biology than it is chemistry. There are some accessible planar geometric questions suggested by the H-P (hydrophobic-hydrophilic) model of protein (amino acid) folding, which could be explored with simple manipulatives (such as K'nex). For example, which proteins in this model have a unique minimum energy folding?   &...


19

One angle you could look at is molecular geometry. Not really my subject area but a couple of examples: Organic molecules can have different chiralities. That means that while one is the mirror image of another you cant rotate one molecule to the other. The reasons for this are pretty deep mathematically, but chemically give rise to interesting things as ...


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