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16 votes
Accepted

Is there a way to extend the analogy that fractions means "x out of y" to show that fractions are also dividing?

I think the heuristic \begin{align*} \frac{8}{4} \quad \longleftrightarrow \quad 8 \textrm{ out of every group of } 4 \end{align*} still makes sense if you emphasize that you want $8$ slices of pizza ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
4 votes

Is there a way to extend the analogy that fractions means "x out of y" to show that fractions are also dividing?

Justin Skycak wrote a great answer that you can use with your kids, but I'd like to explain how what you're telling them relates to what they might be seeing right now and later on in school. I'll be ...
Justin Hancock's user avatar
3 votes

Is there a way to extend the analogy that fractions means "x out of y" to show that fractions are also dividing?

Justin H has a good answer emphasizing how fractions are a complex topic and we learn more and more about them over the years. To your specific question, I would emphasize the need to spend a ...
Guest troll's user avatar
2 votes

Is short division taught these days and if not, why not?

I know I am late to the party, but I absolutely hate short division. It works for simple division problems, for those that you can almost do in your head. But try dividing 35/43 or 692/37. This is ...
CherG's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote

Is there a way to extend the analogy that fractions means "x out of y" to show that fractions are also dividing?

We teach that there are two basic ways of understanding division. På norsk they are called delingsdivisjon and målingsdivisjon; sharing division and measurement division would be rough translations. ...
Tommi's user avatar
  • 7,202

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