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The question of when and why less guidance works or doesn't work is far from obvious. Instead of providing my personal opinion, as many have already done in other answers, I will try to collect some pointers to research that has already tried to answer this question, which you can use to critically review your own approach. Andrew Blair in his article ...


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Over all I think the idea, of hands on for something like C/D is an invariant is laudable, but there are a few caveats. First, students at that age are very aware of precision. The answer "the ratio is 3 and a bit" is fine, but they will not accept it is a constant if one group measures 3.1, the second group 3.2, a third group 3.15. Indeed, in that ...


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A good think is to students pick up several rounded objects (wheels, cans, glasses, etc.) and mesure with rule the length and the diameter and simply divide. And observe if something happens. You can see this idea here (in Catalan - automatic English translation). It is original from Anton Aubanell. Just a note: for measuring the length I think the better is ...


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I find in sports instruction, that girls are more willing to listen to coaching. Boys are more bone-headed and want to do techniques how they think they should, instead of how advised. Also, boys are more tolerant or even responsive to challenges (tough football coach or bootcamp), whereas girls do better with encouragement, positive versus negative ...


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High school boys and girls obviously tend to differ from each other in their behavior, which is probably mostly due to social factors (as opposed to hormones). But if you base your teaching methods on these differences, then you risk perpetuating the same sexism in society that created those differences. It would be different if we knew there were certain ...


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I think the cognitive science is quite clear on this: Teachers should focus on learner similarities, not differences. Teaching to What Students Have in Common The corollary to the author's first "Must Have" (factual knowledge) is that there is one area in which differences matter tremendously: Prior Knowledge. That should determine the majority of ...


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Yes, it is always good when students independently discover mathematical facts, in contrast to being told that some old Greek dude figured it all out 2,500 years ago. It makes students feel useful and participatory, it prepares them for a future where they will be investigating phenomena where formulas aren't as well established, and the experience forms ...


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I can't cite research to back me up on this, and you will want answers that reference research. But. Most of the differences between groups of boys and groups of girls come from how they've been socialized. Our culture pushes boys one way and girls another. Because of this (and not any inherent differences) I imagine that the girls will enjoy cooperation ...


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