New answers tagged

2

The concepts behind limits are actually very important to engineering (in the form of error/precision analysis), but are rarely phrased that way. Given a function $f$, we can imagine an engineering situation where there is some desired range of outputs from the function, but the engineer has control over the value of the inputs of the function. If $f(c) = L$,...


4

It is probably not the place of mathematics educators to decide what mathematics courses engineering majors should take. But a good reference point is ABET accreditation. Over 600 universities in the US have ABET accredited engineering programs. We should defer to the professionals who set these standard and assess outcomes. Here is a description of their ...


1

No, it's definitely not "necessary". I'm not an engineering major, but roomed with one, did a general engineering minor, and worked in/around mechanical, nuclear, mining and chemical engineering (had electrical on staff too). Passed my EIT and was at one time, about to take the PE (mechanical) exam. Most engineers in the workplace don't even use ...


4

Well it doesn't really feel right to get degrees in engineering and gain years of engineering experience without even knowing what a limit actually is. And even though many engineers will do just fine without having been exposed to the rigorous definition of a limit, some engineers will need to be familiar with rigorous definitions/proofs if they ever pursue ...


0

There's a recent book by Nicholas A. Scoville: Discrete Morse Theory, AMS Student Mathematical Library, 2019. Publisher's page: https://bookstore.ams.org/stml-90 MAA review: https://www.maa.org/press/maa-reviews/discrete-morse-theory It looks very accessible to the undergraduate - some background in proof writing is recommended as is some linear algebra, but ...


Top 50 recent answers are included