New answers tagged

1

Here's a short grab-bag of ideas; things I've found useful. Design the test for gradeability. As the instructor, you have the power (hopefully) to design a test that you look forward to grading. Some of us get locked into legacy traditions from examples we've seen, or things mentors dictated. We don't need to necessarily follow those same habits if they're ...


1

Grading may be tedious. But overly long answers can be averted. A student may write a lot, hoping that the mostly irrelevant text will contain whatever the teacher is looking for. But in doing so, the student demonstrates a lack of knowledge – and won't get full credit. No matter what truths are hidden in the sea of irrelevant wrapping. Students write this ...


12

I have found that, for myself, implementing standards based grading has eliminated this frustration entirely. I now find grading to be enjoyable. I have a collection of standards for my course like "Evaluate the truth value of an expression such as $(T \Leftrightarrow F) \implies (F \wedge T)$" or "Give a Fitch style proof outline for a ...


3

I actually get excited to grade my students exams. I see the test/exams as the whole point of the class: the chance for the student to demonstrate what they know or don't know about certain problems. It's like the chance to get inside of my students head and see "oh, that's what they were thinking." I also feel that grading is a responsibility that ...


2

Overall, it can become tedious and even frustrating to grade math homework or exams. Do you share the same frustration, and how do you handle it in the best possible way? Some random ideas I have heard others use: Choose a small subset of proof questions to grade in detail. You're right that proofs can be long to write and difficult to parse for the grader. ...


2

I grit my teeth and do it. Skimming long answers for the relevant parts is a skill. One way of handling the frustration is talking about it with someone. If that someone is also grading the same exams or homework, or was/is involved in teaching the course, this can even be genuinely useful. But really, on the scale of frustrations, this is not a big deal. At ...


Top 50 recent answers are included