22

Instructor at University of Washington here - we were one of the early closures, so I feel like we're starting to get the hang of it. Here's what I'm using: Zoom: Zoom is similar to Skype, with better support for many-participant calling and additional features. It has a built-in whiteboard you can write or type on, mechanics for allowing students to "raise ...


20

I taught gifted elementary students for over 25 years and feel my 4th-6th grade students benefited greatly from using Khan Academy with some direction from me. The first time I used Khan Academy was with my sixth graders who were having trouble understanding why the distributive property was true. I showed them the Khan Academy's video on the topic so ...


16

Already put two comments but ideas keep coming to me so I'll just package them here. Keep in mind I'm not an educator, I'm just trying to think of practical solutions to the problem as a whole. Another answer recommends YouTube to upload source material but I feel this might be inadequate interaction. Other alternatives: Discord Recently in response to ...


14

A year after this question was asked, the bloom is definitely off the MOOC rose. The primary finding is that the majority of people who finish one already possess a prior bachelor's degree; offering one to say, at-risk or remedial students has been a failure over and over again. Some links that you should consider: Recent overview of the field, "The MOOC ...


14

The case for WeBWorK tl;dr - use WebWork as an easy way of giving students as much practice solving problems as they can handle. Learn by doing lots of problems with a tight feedback loop. It engages the game-playing, obsessive nature in us. Main use case - Homework engine The two biggest features of a VLE/LMS are the presentation of materials and ...


11

I gave a presentation to my department about this today. Like you, as I see in a comment, I am also at a CUNY math department. I haven't done all-online classes before, but I've used Blackboard heavily for ~20 years and have had a hybrid (partly online) class for the last two years. I have access to Blackboard Collaborate. My only cameras at home are ...


11

My technique is pretty low-tech. I distribute solutions to the homework after it's due, so students can mostly tell what they did right or wrong by looking at the solutions. Then I reply to each student's email with any additional comments that they need in order to get feedback that they can't get just by reading the solutions. E.g., #37 -- What went ...


10

I would suggest a distinction: A MOOC really should be massive, that means some 1000 participants or even more. In this case your problems will be about server capacity and technical things. The work like answering questions will then be done by the community (like in this forum). This, however, always requires some people to be online in your forum. Blended ...


10

The Lone Ranger had escaped many dangers, but this time, the situation was hopeless. Back to the wall with 200 wild Indians surrounding him. He turned to his faithful sidekick, Tonto, and said "what will we do now?" Tonto replied, "who's 'we', paleface?" The needs of the administrators, students, teachers are all different. In other words, "who's '...


9

I like You Tube for posting videos. Once you get started it's pretty simple. There are various levels of privacy possible which you can read about. If your school has a convenient way to post videos and you have broadband (we're talking about 1-1.5 Gb files here, do NOT use HD resolution or worse yet the 4k resolution...). Given all that, basically the thing ...


8

In my view, Khan Academy should be used as one would (ideally) use a textbook: To provide students with an overview of the material and algorithmic drills so the teacher has more free time to discuss the nuances. I think Khan Academy is brilliant if used in this way. I personally learned to handle basic probability thanks to Sal's explanations. The trouble (...


8

If you have access to a device capable of touch input (like a tablet), then I would highly recommend using a stylus to annotate the pdf document. It should take almost the same time as if you were marking assignments on paper. Foxit PDF and Gimp have in-built support for touch input. OneNote is also good for mobile and tablet devices. If you don't have ...


7

A few years back I followed a distance master degree in maths at UPMC (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, in Paris). At the time the university sent course documents and exercices by post every week, solutions to exercices had to be sent back, and students had to be physically present for the final exams. Subscription was cheap (a few hundreds euros I think). ...


7

I started strongly encouraging my students to participate in math.SE about a year ago. Excluding this year it was all with third year students taking group theory and/or complex analysis. This year I'm also teaching discrete maths to first year students. What I notice is that those students who take the few hours to climb the learning curve for properly ...


7

Almost 20 years ago, I faced a similar issue in the course of designing some on-line calculus exercises... For me, it turned out to be simplest to use a Monte-Carlo idea, namely, to evaluate both expressions at a "random" set of locations, and test for agreement within some not-too-tight bound. Yes, some necessity of tolerating invalid inputs and such, but ...


7

I am using zoom, and getting better attendance sometimes than in my face-to-face classes. Modified tools for getting interaction: 1. I ask students to put a number from 1 to 5 in the chat to rate their understanding. 2. I ask for a brave volunteer to work with me sometimes, and I walk that one student through, asking them to give me a next step, etc. ...


6

Khan Academy has been very helpful as a supplement to my instruction in the classroom, especially for developmental students in higher education. I agree it can be confusing for students at times, as some topics are hard to find, but I occasionally set up a Khan Academy shell for my classes (especially over the Summer when my courses are online) to help ...


6

There aren't many choices that hit all the bullet points you listed, but there are some approximations that are quite good: Piazza (mentioned in another answer) is good. I've used it several times for classes. It does handle LaTeX very well. However, it's a threaded discussion board and not chat software -- i.e. it does not do things in real time (unless ...


6

There's Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications by Judson and Beezer. It doesn't get to Grobner bases but does cover the standard material (and some non-standard stuff, too). It has Sage code and exercises throughout. I will also add that it includes chapters on coding theory, cryptography and lattices and boolean algebras, all of interest to people in ...


6

Well, since I have also been obliged to teach from home due to CoVID-19 these days, I will describe here a possible solution to your problem. As a fast and cheap solution - I have been granted no access to any platform, unfortunately - I use the following: Skype, as a platform to communicate with my students and conduct the major part of the lesson. ...


6

In some sense this question is waaaay too broad, but it is attracting a useful collection of hints, and it's super topical for thousands of college math instructors (likely to be followed by primary/secondary ones), so here are a few things which I don't see mentioned yet, collated from the far too much time spent on this subject today. Web/Doc cam. There ...


6

I am surprised that a school would effectively say "go figure it out". You ask for "brainstorming"... here are my thoughts.. You haven't quite defines your goal, although I did hear, loud and clear, you'd like 'free' or close to it. Still, there are a number of outcomes. Live video - I believe there are many options, but in general, a multiuser ...


6

When I write an assessment, I am trying to understand how well the students have mastered some particular body of material. In principle, a "perfect designer" could write multiple assessments with wildly different questions or numbers of questions, and consistently obtain valid results. However, I am not a perfect designer—nor, frankly, is anyone ...


6

It seems like some of the other answers are aiming at PhD programs. I would suggest (as your question on academia.sx suggests) that you may wish to look at a Master's program (at a non-PhD-granting institution). Obviously not all have the same quality, but a lot of them have high-quality coursework, with assistantships of various kinds. I regularly see ...


5

This won't help the OP for the summer of 2017, but let me put this here for future readers of this site: Michigan Virtual High School is (as I write these words) developing its own online Algebra 2 curriculum. The curriculum, which is expected launch in September 2017, consists of two separate half-courses (Algebra 2A and Algebra 2B) which can be taken ...


5

Here's a quick and dirty implementation: http://nilock.github.io/MathSnips/MultQuiz/MultQuiz.html edit: This was a bit of a seat-of-pants stream-of-consciousness hack job, so the flexibility of the platform going forward is not great. Usage should be mostly self-explanatory, but I'll mention that the system is biased against questions involving 0 and 1 (...


5

I would be pessimistic. An open-ended approach works well in the liberal arts and social sciences -- such as the course on video game culture -- where there are a fairly small core group of skills (reading critically, researching, analysis, writing and commentary) that can be applied broadly to a large number of subject areas, and practiced in a spiraling ...


5

The folks at Art of Problem Solving have what you need. It's not cheap ($559), but they work with many students like you, and are highly recommended. I think you will find it worth what it costs, if you can afford that. (And if not, ask them for a scholarship. I don't know if they'd do it or not...)


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