22

Instructor at University of Washington here - we were one of the early closures, so I feel like we're starting to get the hang of it. Here's what I'm using: Zoom: Zoom is similar to Skype, with better support for many-participant calling and additional features. It has a built-in whiteboard you can write or type on, mechanics for allowing students to "raise ...


16

Already put two comments but ideas keep coming to me so I'll just package them here. Keep in mind I'm not an educator, I'm just trying to think of practical solutions to the problem as a whole. Another answer recommends YouTube to upload source material but I feel this might be inadequate interaction. Other alternatives: Discord Recently in response to ...


14

The case for WeBWorK tl;dr - use WebWork as an easy way of giving students as much practice solving problems as they can handle. Learn by doing lots of problems with a tight feedback loop. It engages the game-playing, obsessive nature in us. Main use case - Homework engine The two biggest features of a VLE/LMS are the presentation of materials and ...


11

I gave a presentation to my department about this today. Like you, as I see in a comment, I am also at a CUNY math department. I haven't done all-online classes before, but I've used Blackboard heavily for ~20 years and have had a hybrid (partly online) class for the last two years. I have access to Blackboard Collaborate. My only cameras at home are ...


11

My technique is pretty low-tech. I distribute solutions to the homework after it's due, so students can mostly tell what they did right or wrong by looking at the solutions. Then I reply to each student's email with any additional comments that they need in order to get feedback that they can't get just by reading the solutions. E.g., #37 -- What went ...


10

The Lone Ranger had escaped many dangers, but this time, the situation was hopeless. Back to the wall with 200 wild Indians surrounding him. He turned to his faithful sidekick, Tonto, and said "what will we do now?" Tonto replied, "who's 'we', paleface?" The needs of the administrators, students, teachers are all different. In other words, "who's '...


9

I like You Tube for posting videos. Once you get started it's pretty simple. There are various levels of privacy possible which you can read about. If your school has a convenient way to post videos and you have broadband (we're talking about 1-1.5 Gb files here, do NOT use HD resolution or worse yet the 4k resolution...). Given all that, basically the thing ...


8

If you have access to a device capable of touch input (like a tablet), then I would highly recommend using a stylus to annotate the pdf document. It should take almost the same time as if you were marking assignments on paper. Foxit PDF and Gimp have in-built support for touch input. OneNote is also good for mobile and tablet devices. If you don't have ...


7

I am using zoom, and getting better attendance sometimes than in my face-to-face classes. Modified tools for getting interaction: 1. I ask students to put a number from 1 to 5 in the chat to rate their understanding. 2. I ask for a brave volunteer to work with me sometimes, and I walk that one student through, asking them to give me a next step, etc. ...


6

When I write an assessment, I am trying to understand how well the students have mastered some particular body of material. In principle, a "perfect designer" could write multiple assessments with wildly different questions or numbers of questions, and consistently obtain valid results. However, I am not a perfect designer—nor, frankly, is anyone ...


6

In some sense this question is waaaay too broad, but it is attracting a useful collection of hints, and it's super topical for thousands of college math instructors (likely to be followed by primary/secondary ones), so here are a few things which I don't see mentioned yet, collated from the far too much time spent on this subject today. Web/Doc cam. There ...


6

Well, since I have also been obliged to teach from home due to CoVID-19 these days, I will describe here a possible solution to your problem. As a fast and cheap solution - I have been granted no access to any platform, unfortunately - I use the following: Skype, as a platform to communicate with my students and conduct the major part of the lesson. ...


6

I am surprised that a school would effectively say "go figure it out". You ask for "brainstorming"... here are my thoughts.. You haven't quite defines your goal, although I did hear, loud and clear, you'd like 'free' or close to it. Still, there are a number of outcomes. Live video - I believe there are many options, but in general, a multiuser ...


6

It seems like some of the other answers are aiming at PhD programs. I would suggest (as your question on academia.sx suggests) that you may wish to look at a Master's program (at a non-PhD-granting institution). Obviously not all have the same quality, but a lot of them have high-quality coursework, with assistantships of various kinds. I regularly see ...


5

I taught all of my classes in an asynchronous (fully online) format this term. Based on ideas posted here, I chose the following routine: Content Delivery: I made videos with my phone and posted them to YouTube for the "lecture" content. I printed copies of activities I wrote, and worked through them in the video, periodicaly asking students to &...


5

You could look around for a program like CalTech's SURF, which takes visiting students from other undegraduate institutions. However, I suspect that it's too late to do those for this summer or (since you're graduating) next summer. So failing that, my suggestions would be the following: (1) Line up the best recommendations you can from the people you've ...


5

Here are some ideas: As Brendan says above, you can give an example or non-example, and ask the student to explain why (using the definition) it is an example or non-example. You can ask for examples satisfying certain properties ("Give an example of a relation on a three element set which is transitive and symmetric, but not reflexive"). You can ...


4

My university (I am in Spain) has Microsoft Teams integrated with student accounts, so I use this. My classes are two hours. I open a chat (there are 60-70 students). (Zoom for free only allows 40 minutes and I am not sure it can handle the 60-70 students; a colleague is using the free video mixing software OBS and broadcasting class via Youtube, but ...


4

I'm a full-time faculty member at a community college in NJ. I've been teaching for 12 years but have never taught an online course. When our college left for spring break I was left scrambling for how to make use of the tools that I had at that moment: my course notes and textbooks, my laptop, and my iPhone. With these tools I write, by hand, a short ...


4

I will share what I have been doing. I cannot claim this is popular, nor that it is necessarily the best, feasible option for everyone. But I know that when I started searching online for suggestions, I could not find a full description of anyone's method. So I'd like to at least share mine here. tl;dr: I make slides in Beamer (LaTeX). I use an app on a ...


4

I have an old Wacom Bamboo tablet and pen and a microphone. I use xournal (http://xournal.sourceforge.net) and record what I'm writing and saying using a screencasting program called vokoscreen, starting and stopping occasionally so I get a bunch of video files. I use flowblade (https://jliljebl.github.io/flowblade/) to splice these together and then use ...


4

I just spent ~3 hrs making a 4-min video :-). A few notes that may help those in similar software situations: MacOS, Catalina. Others ignore. I used QuickTime to record a subset of my screen ("Screen Recording"). Apparently there is no way to pause QuickTime. So I recorded, stopped, recorded, stopped. And eventually stitched the ~8 recordings into one (...


4

Question #1: This thought comes from teaching college classes, but may help a math circle too. You can communicate more often online, so you can keep them playing with ideas by sending out daily puzzles. Or you can send out a few puzzles related to your topic a day or two before "meeting", to get them thinking. Question #2: For 5th to 9th graders, assuming ...


4

We use Gradescope, https://www.gradescope.com/ Basically, you upload the scans to Gradescope, and as you make comments on one student's paper, you can assign point values to those comments and re-use the comments on every other student's paper. If you decide at some point that you want to change the point value, you can just do it, and all of the students' ...


4

I am recommending MyOpenMath (MOM) for this. It is a free, open source, online course management system for mathematics and other quantitative fields. [Note: There are other systems out there, such as WeBWorK, which have similar functionality. I am recommending MOM for its quick set-up for those transitioning to systems like this.] MyOpenMath supports "...


4

What is the medium of the content? If they are videos, then YouTube would probably be first option but if they are, say, pdfs, then you might have to make a blog and then upload to that there. It still might feel like an island at first but it will gain traffic from your students and then other people who find it in search results. There are also problem-...


3

Well, one idea would be that of shifting to evaluating students through projects. For instance, there could be created a pool of project topics which will be randomly assigned to students. This may be way off the usual written examination, it makes it, however, necessary for the students to process the knowledge they have obtained conceptually and not only "...


3

My home teaching setup. Still to be tested.


3

Wanted to make this a comment but don't have enough reputation. There's Scratchwork and WorldWideWhiteboard that do what you want. They allow you to write in latex and it appears automatically on the board.


3

(In before the close!) I'd say the PDE course looks more like a traditional course than the prob/stats course. Look at the hours expected, for example (~6.5 versus ~1.5), each times 8 weeks. The PDE course looks like a solid half to two thirds of a semester of a normal, engineering support course. You cover a couple of the 3-4 major equations. And get ...


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