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1

I have been taught both methods. By different teacher, and at different age, although I do not remember in which method first. Today I am using both indifferently, sometimes changing of method in the middle of the subtraction. I noted a tiny preference for the Austrian method, but I think it is purely esthetic, because most of the time the choice is totally ...


0

Both these methods suffer from the same problem: they work from right to left, despite our reading numbers from left to right. That's why children have trouble with long sums. I discovered as a small child that I could always be the first kid in class to put my hand up when the teacher wrote a subtraction (or addition) sum on the blackboard, by working from ...


-1

I'm a big fan of number bonds. They're a nice visual representation of the idea that you're breaking the number apart (especially if you actually show how some objects go into one bubble and the rest go into the other).


0

I am right now teaching Numbers to kids and I think it is the toughest part because Numbers are the true abstract thing in math. So I first taught them what 1(One) means and they got it pretty quickly. So now I am approaching bigger Numbers and I am trying to make them understand that bigger numbers are "COLLECTION" of smaller numbers. So the problem with "...


0

I'm not sure how you would translate the following into the language of 10-year-olds, but the teacher should first understand this much: The variables x and y are respectively in the ratio a:b means only that x/y = a/b (for non-zero values of a, b, x and y). Similarly, the variables x, y and z are respectively in the ratio of a:b:c means only that x/y = a/...


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