17

I think a great reason to post homework solutions is so that students have a way of reviewing their homework before exams (it would be nice if they were to review homeworks whenever they get their graded work back, but this seems to be a rare practice). While a well-graded problem set should have comments pointing out any mistakes the student may have made, ...


14

Other people have given other good reasons to have old exams be public, but I want to emphasize the one Andrew Stacey points out in comments: old exams often are public, and pretending they're not only confuses yourself and punishes students with less access. If students get to take their exams home (as they can at most schools, though I know there are ...


12

Homework (and exam) solutions should be published, at the very least to enable students to request regrading. Yes, many students never look at the solutions (I even have a stack of homework and exams from last term that they didn't even bother to pick up). But that some don't bother isn't reason enough to deprive those who are interested of being able to ...


11

Edit: See also the PDF linked here: Wikipedia has a list of mathematics education journals; I happen to prefer the list of mathematics education journals compiled here, as they are provided along with some basic facts: journal summary, type of articles solicited, audience reached, etc. Some of these facts derive from the following article: Törner, G., &...


10

At my university publishing old exams is considered a good practice. Some advantages: Students know what to expect during real test. Students can test their knowledge and check which topics they need to relearn. There is an additional problem supply for practice. Sometimes professors lose their old tests (e.g. disk failure, etc.), and publishing them ...


9

I think it is important to make the solutions available for the homeworks and exams administered in any course, perhaps after you think that the students have had sufficient time to think about the questions. A student who has spent enough time thinking about the question will have somewhere to look for; and those who do not think about will not bother any ...


7

Yes. The idea is not only to give them well thought-out answers and solutions to the problems presented but also (ideally) to show how these were constructed. Enlightening solutions make explicit the intricacies of the problem and how to deal with them. For maximum effect, the problem set should have been designed possibly with some open-ended questions ...


6

I was a bit surprised to not see anyone taking issue with the "collected and graded" aspect of the "homeworks". Research done by the SFU mathematics department (Gray & Mulholland) showed that the concept of grading 'practice' led to the occurrence of copying solutions. Students thought these homeworks were for the professors and not for students to learn....


6

I like sharing solutions for a few reasons, many already mentioned by others: they are good study aids before exams, students will catch your mistakes/assumptions, students can see what is considered "ideal", etc. However, I've noticed (through pageview tracking on course management sites) that few students actually look at them! So, I think it behooves ...


5

As for who will publish undergraduate math research, I suggest that Educational Studies in Mathematics is influential in math education research, and will publish research at the undergraduate level. A member of my dissertation committee recently published a study of the concept of limit in an undergraduate mathematics classroom there. I am not sure what ...


5

The links you've already provided (especially the second one) are quite good. The top journal, I'd say, is the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (JRME). Depending on the content of what you wish to publish, it may be that a journal about education (not specific to mathematics) or one about psychology or cognitive studies (again, not specific to ...


5

While writing and releasing solutions is in general a really good idea, because it helps the students see their errors, one major problem with doing this is that it increases cheating in the future. One has to be careful to balance releasing the solutions with the ability to re-use good problems in future instances of the course.


3

Usually I give the odd-numbered problems as homework, so the students can check their answers immediately. If I am giving problems that they must think longer about, I would want to eventually provide good answers.


3

In general, I am in favor of publishing old exams for similar reasons to those given in other answers. However, some caveats are: If the course material has changed, questions from old exams may be misleading. Likewise, if the course instructor has changed and the new instructor has a different style of asking questions or likes to emphasize different ...


3

Assuming that one of the disciplines involved was mathematics and you have some novel insights or ideas about how to create such a course, PRIMUS is a good generalist option, especially if you can "aim" the article at other undergraduate faculty who might be interested in creating such a course but aren't sure where to start.


2

It is key to remember the purpose of the assessment. I presume this is an end-of-course summative assessment. You are therefore trying to find out to what extent they have learned the material you have taught which may be required for further study or employment. You don't want them to study all of mathematics, you want them to study the specific topics that ...


2

Exam questions usually are similar to homework questions, but they are not quite the same. Especially for first-year courses, I think it's a very good thing to give an idea how the exam might look like. If you provide solutions, you will have to decide if you just provide brief answers or full solutions. The former allows the students to check their ...


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