4

After giving the book another look I have to expand on my comment above and make it stronger: no, this isn't a good book for a first-time learner, and in fact I think it's a terrible choice. I looked at the second edition (not the Gardner update), but unless Gardner practically rewrote the book I don't think this matters much. At the very beginning, ...


4

The fact that the book uses infinitesimals (presented informally) rather than limits is definitely a big deal, and I think you will have to read the book for yourself to see if it works for you. When I was exposed to the idea of $dx$ as some kind of infinitely small quantity, my philosophical confusion completely blocked me. But the idea of a limit, even ...


3

In a sense it is OK. In the sense that almost any book (except for one that is very difficult, and assigned to a weaker student and/or one without strong motivation to prevail) is OK. It's really more about your sticktoitiveness than anything else, what you get out of it. I'm working on a language study right now. I have several different texts available ...


2

While this is not quite an app, I believe it fits within the spirit of the question: Desmos activities. https://teacher.desmos.com/collections/featured While some Desmos activities are very math-forward, others follow Dan Myers' "Three Acts" format, giving students an interesting scenario and asking them to solve it with math, and showing the ...


1

Also, get Steven Strogatz's "Infinite Powers" Book. It doesn't have any work problems. He very carefully explains many of the fundamental ideas of calculus. I was fuzzy on some of the ideas, and his book really cleared some items up. Calculus has a "tortoise and a hare", aspect to it. If you take it slowly you will learn more than if ...


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