New answers tagged

4

Although you can find some good hints through recommendations, there's nothing like scanning a book shelf (in real life or virtually), taking a peek into a book all by yourself, reading the preface (where the author details whom is the book to), maybe reading the 1st chapter and trying the exercises. This way you'll find something that's accessible and ...


7

If you're looking to fill in a deficient high-school education then I might recommend the OpenStax series, which has free, open-resource books for everything from arithmetic through calculus and statistics. https://openstax.org/subjects/math


4

Here is a list of four easy-to-read, enjoyable Math books that can get you started on a journey toward a true quantitative understanding and connection with the world, which it sounds like you might be seeking right now. Math With Bad Drawings, by Ben Orlin The Secrets of Mental Math, by Arthur Benjamin Flatland, by Edwin Abbott Factfulness, by Hans Rosling ...


8

Permit me to recommend the answers to this MO question: Are there other nice math books close to the style of Tristan Needham?. The emphasis here is on readable, interesting expositions, a rather different focus from Schaum's Outlines. Here is my comment on the Needham book (Visual Complex Analysis) in particular: Here is one figure from the book, p.135: ...


5

Try Schaum's Outlines. They are designed to be review material and drill manuals. Also, the text tends to be simpler writing. This is much more efficient for the adult learner and self studier (than the loquacious doorstops that are designed to appeal to professors and textbook selection committees, rather than to the learner). Check on Amazon and see ...


Top 50 recent answers are included