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7

I taught two sections of a course last semester, one MWF (50 mins each) and one TuTh (75 mins each). It was not great. The main problem is not even splitting material across days. It's an issue of timing and attention. It takes much more effort on the teacher's part, both pre- and during class, to effectively engage for 75 mins. I found myself planning ...


3

One specific problem I have with classes which meet only twice a week is that in the last few years I've been giving more frequent, lower-stakes exams. (There are reams of research suggesting that this is better for students' learning and retention in any subject.) I don't mind using up a lot of MWF class days on exams, but it's harder for two-day-a-week ...


3

You might try getting the students to understand Braess's Paradox, which can be phrased as a paradox about traffic flow, modeled by a weighted graph. The paradox is that the addition of a "short cut" road leads, under individual rational behavior by each driver, to everyone taking longer to reach their destination.           The ...


2

Personally, I feel I take away a lot more from x isolated talk than from x talks at one conference day. For the seminar, especially if it is a sequence of talks from one book or article where one "works through" something together I would especially recommend several meetings. In the best case, students will try to actively digest the talks afterwards ...


1

To relieve part of the burden, ask the students themselves to participate actively (with real responsibilities) in the organization. Lighten up/complement the seminar with some invited speakers. Depending on the breadth and depth, and the number of presentations, it miight need to be programmed beforehand. Leave plenty of time between presentations, for ...


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