Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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There are many such programs, but I highly recommend WeBWorK. The founders received the American Mathematical Society award for impact on teaching math in 2016, it is used at hundreds of institutions (primarily in the United States, but I believe not exclusively at all) and is open source. You can (I think still) pay for hosting or set it up locally, which ...


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I think you only need to have this knowledge if you are teaching a unit or significant part of the course, using a CAS. This is probably a small minority of courses.* In that case, what makes sense is whatever CAS you will be expecting the kids to use (I recommend picking one specific one). The one I know is Maple, but I'm sure the others are fine too. ...


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Just one small thing to consider for you: If you like to do non-standardized exercises (i.e. the ones where the solution isn't available in a textbook), then a software can help a lot with that. The example I like the most is the calculation of Eigenvalues. For an exercise, you usually want nice Eigenvalues (e.g. $1,2,3,4$), but how do you get an ...


3

I made the following website with the aim of producing a Desmos-like experience in 3D for my multivariable calculus students. math3d.org You can use math3d.org to create simple surface plots or complex, animated visualizations. Some features: Create and animate points, lines, vectors, curves, surfaces (explicit & implicit), and vecotr fields Intuitive ...


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Perhaps what he needs (or needed) to finish his courses is a screen-reader that can handle mathematics? The answer to this question, Are there screen readers that can read math equations?, is Yes: There are screen-readers that can handle MathML. They rely on MathPlayer, "a universal math reader that now enables math to be spoken in assistive technology ...


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Not an answer; just a tangential remark. In general it is not an easy problem to reconstruct a polygon from various sets of data. If the data does not uniquely determine the polygon, it would not be easy to "generate a credible figure," to quote the OP, compatible with the partial reconstruction. For example, the paper below reconstructs a polygon from its ...


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When I was a kid, (around 4 years old), I was playing super nintendo games, because my dad was playing these too. You easily find out that mario has 3 lives, and that once it gets to zero, it's game over. You find coins, and once you have 100 coins, you win one more life. You aren't searching for maths, it comes to you directly. Then some games (like zelda)...


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