17

I would put dots where I want 1 standard deviation to be, because I know that's where the inflection points are. (I just graphed $y=e^{-x^{2}/2}$ on desmos, and I see that the inflection points are at a height of about 60% of the maximum, so that's about 3/5ths of the way up. But I didn't do that step back when I taught statistics.) And then the curve is ...


5

One trick for free-handing a more symmetrical bell curve is to draw it in two strokes, each starting from the center point (once right-to-left and once left-to-right). Perhaps you could make a stencil out of cardboard, which you could trace onto the board. However, I wonder about the pedagogical value of perfectly accurate drawings. There is an important ...


4

Short answer: Yes, the Common Core (correctly, IMO) believes that workers in the twenty-first century should have an elementary grounding in some topics of what you probably believe to be college-level statistics. Longer answer: Every state is free to interpret and implement the standards as they wish. This is especially true at the high school level, where ...


2

Given you seem to have zero exposure to this material, I would just look for a reasonable undergrad text. I would avoid classes "for business" or the like (although really they are way better than nothing!) I would also be a little careful about asking for "mathematical statistics". Some people may interpret that as asking for a hyper ...


1

Consider using a tool such as a 'flexible curve' to draw your curves on a whiteboard or paper. It's like a stiff mouldable ruler - you bend it into your required shape and then draw along it.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible