20

I would put dots where I want 1 standard deviation to be, because I know that's where the inflection points are. (I just graphed $y=e^{-x^{2}/2}$ on desmos, and I see that the inflection points are at a height of about 60% of the maximum, so that's about 3/5ths of the way up. But I didn't do that step back when I taught statistics.) And then the curve is ...


5

One trick for free-handing a more symmetrical bell curve is to draw it in two strokes, each starting from the center point (once right-to-left and once left-to-right). Perhaps you could make a stencil out of cardboard, which you could trace onto the board. However, I wonder about the pedagogical value of perfectly accurate drawings. There is an important ...


4

Short answer: Yes, the Common Core (correctly, IMO) believes that workers in the twenty-first century should have an elementary grounding in some topics of what you probably believe to be college-level statistics. Longer answer: Every state is free to interpret and implement the standards as they wish. This is especially true at the high school level, where ...


3

This might be helpful: Pishro-Nik, Hossein. Introduction to probability, statistics, and random processes. (2016). Open access textbook. Section 8.2.3: Maximum Likelihood Estimation. His exposition includes five examples, several discrete, with solutions. "I have a bag that contains 3 balls. Each ball is either red or blue." Etc.


3

Expanding a bit on my comment, there is (1) a new textbook available for project-based intro stats, (2) an online syllabus describing a course based on community projects, and (3) an academic paper concluding that "the project-based course ... provides a promising model for getting students hooked on the power and excitement of applied statistics." ...


2

Given you seem to have zero exposure to this material, I would just look for a reasonable undergrad text. I would avoid classes "for business" or the like (although really they are way better than nothing!) I would also be a little careful about asking for "mathematical statistics". Some people may interpret that as asking for a hyper ...


2

I suspect the avenue to answering this revolves much more around his condition and his reaction to it than it does around statistics as a field. For one thing "legal blindness" is a pretty different thing than complete blindness. I also admit to ignorance of "computer induced medical problems" syndrome (for example how well is it ...


2

First, I would try to emphasize accessible texts, exercises, etc. If you are weak, you don't load 225 on the bar and start benching. You absolutly SHOULD get in the gym. And will have faster gains than someone who is already very strong. But you need to be progressive. Going too heavy will hurt/discourage you. Similarly with studying something you're ...


2

You could try writing careful and detailed notes for yourself, and by "careful and detailed", I mean something you think even your former teachers would think is good and something you would feel comfortable in lending to someone else who needed to review the material. Maybe use two or three different colors of pens, if the notes are handwritten -- ...


1

Consider using a tool such as a 'flexible curve' to draw your curves on a whiteboard or paper. It's like a stiff mouldable ruler - you bend it into your required shape and then draw along it.


1

Basic Practice is a lower level book than Intro Practice. I used Basic Practice for a no-prerequisite data analysis course, and I used Intro Practice for an algebra-prerequisite elementary stats course. Both are in color and have free instructor manuals that students can easily find on the internet.


1

That's pretty normal to have a lot of ground to cover. Even with the more friendly books, it still ends up being a lot of concepts and formulas. Given this, I think you sort of have to make your peace with the idea that kids will not master everything, especially in the long term. I probably wouldn't try some fundamental change to improve things since it ...


1

You might point out that the $3$-trial experiment has $8$ possible outcomes and $256$ possible events, which are subsets of the sample space; whereas each trial has $2$ possible outcomes, which can be contextually characterised as a success and a failure. To distinguish between trial outcomes and experiment outcomes (or to remind about their distinction), I ...


1

I found http://www.randomservices.org/random/ useful. It is written in a formal language, but it has examples, exercises and also interactive demonstrations/illustrations.


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