New answers tagged

1

Their behaviour is classic Dunning-Kruger. The way to change their behaviour is to give them more knowledge about the subject (in this case e.g. mathematical induction). I know this seems really difficult or perhaps even impossible: At the moment they seem to be working against you and seem to be actively refusing to acquire more skill. Perhaps you could ...


0

You do not specify how many of these students have a background in cs, but you indicate some of them does. Computer science stress to a high degree concrete and clear logic used to solve concrete real world problems as effectively as possible. Therefore connecting whatever proof you are trying to teach to concrete, real world problems and demonstrating how ...


4

This is a tricky situation. Here are some strategies that I have followed in my Discrete Math for CS class, perhaps they will be of some use to you. I make it clear that the purpose of the class is to understand how to read mathematical definitions and what constitutes a proof and that this understanding is to be inculcated in a hands-on manner, i.e., by ...


4

The problem with induction is common (I'm sure you are aware of that). With an audience of CS majors I would try and utilize the connection between induction and recursion. Basically driving home the point that induction is the tool for proving that a function defined by recursion gives the predicted outcome. I would go for the throat and use Ackermann's ...


1

Take Them Seriously Authority cannot be demanded or mandated; it must be earned. Frankly, I think you can and must earn it. You obviously take your job seriously, because you took the time to think carefully about these students, their disruptive behavior, take notes, and solicit advice. That's great! When a student challenges you in class, you should ...


25

There's probably no silver bullet. But one tool I use is in these situations (e.g., I teach discrete mathematics etc. at a U.S. community college) is to very closely align with a good textbook. In fact, here's my personal note to myself in my checklist for preparing a new course: The most important thing is to TEACH FROM A GOOD BOOK. My motivation here is ...


-1

Well, there are interesting philosophical questions that remain in logic. Regarding entailment, for example. Why not talk to them about it? eg. Relevance Logic. And induction too, might be seen as rather intemperate. Even, perhaps, as exhibiting a debauched lack of discipline. Maybe have a side talk about axioms vs. axiom schemes, and eg. Predicative ...


28

You don't say in the question what kind of school this is. It must be a four-year school rather than a community college, but there is no indication of what its admissions standards are like. If this is a state school that's easy to get into, say Cal State Fullerton, and a lot of these students are math education students, then you're extremely lucky that ...


8

Some helpful feelings of mine about teaching: You can't force someone to learn. As an undergraduate professor, I am responsible for being a resource to provide my students with the information they need and some motivation and structure. However, my students are welcome to pass up those resources. I am responsible for providing a classroom environment ...


17

EDIT: I would like to clarify that my response below is not intended to be definitive. This is an extremely difficult problem to have. It is perhaps the most difficult problem one can have as a teacher: a complete breakdown of the trust in each other which is needed to make communication possible. The idea below is only a stab in the dark, which has many ...


Top 50 recent answers are included