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2

One thing common, especially at middle school/high school levels is to list the unknown (for example, x = 3) as one of the options, especially when the question actually asks you to solve for something else that requires knowing x. At the middle/high school levels, several students have a habit of thinking that "x is the answer, or you're done once your find ...


-1

So. I started working as a teaching assistant for a course, and the professor showed me "test generating" software. It comes down to the fact that the editor of a textbook creates various open, multiple choice, and true/false questions and answers, and you - using the software - can just click "generate X number of MC questions". No need to think about it at ...


21

If a teacher has taught the course before, and has asked questions that are free-response (not multiple-choice), then the teacher can look at the incorrect answers previously given by the students. If not, then the teacher can ask other teachers who have had this experience. Errors that "appear to stem from consistent application of a faulty method, ...


7

I once read a suggestion to explain the difference between local and global maxima by using the example of Mount Everest (global maximum of the height function) and K2 (local maximum). I consider this a bad example because it gives two erroneous impressions: (1) local maxima almost achieve the global maximum value (because K2 is almost as high as Everest) ...


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I freelance as an item writer, someone who writes questions for standardized tests. When making up alternate choices, I always have to justify my reasons for the "wrong answers" or distractors. Here are some strategies I use. I focus on common misconceptions for students at that grade level.This is easier after years of classroom experience. In a ...


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