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9

You might start out by giving them a test in the kind of arithmetic they are supposed to teach. This article in the Guardian from 2010 reported that many primary school teachers in the UK were unable to do the arithmetic required by the primary curriculum. Fewer than four out of 10 of those who sat the test – designed for 11-year-olds – could calculate 2.1% ...


8

Partial answer regarding an approach to fix this problem. First: Don't tell them (criticism), but lead them to find out themselves (insight). Now comes the fun part. Don't let them write just the questions. Have them each write the question on one sheet, and write the correct solution, and a short (maybe single-sentence) explanation for their solution (...


21

Note: This is an answer from a non-US perspective, after reading some remarks from @Rusty Core I fear it won't be helpful. How about you set certain standards and let sub-standard students fail your class? Just like in every other course the goal is to separate the wheat from the chaff. I wouldn't want my children to be educated by teachers asking the kind ...


1

I did a survey with my students, asking them what is their preferred presentation method. Here are the results: 27% preferred the "invisible content", where the content is fully hidden and displays as the lesson goes on. 42% preferred the "transparent content", where the content is transparent and displays as the lesson goes on. 31% ...


48

You might try starting this kind of lesson with an assignment where you provide a list of different responses to the prompt "Write a variety of word problems which would require the student to multiply 2.3 by 1.4" and have students (perhaps in groups) arrange and rank them by clarity/mistakes/etc. Instead of having students start by writing their ...


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