Skip to main content
15 votes
Accepted

What's it called when multiple concepts are combined into a single problem?

The answer I am about to give is a little tangential, but I think that it will help to answer the question "How do I communicate to students that the problem I am setting for them is going to ...
Xander Henderson's user avatar
  • 8,223
14 votes

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

checking the most popular textbooks: Papa Rudin has 3 occurrences of 'pure imaginary' vs. 0 of 'purely' Ahlfors has it 0 vs. 14 Stein-Shakarchi: 0 vs. 9 Conway: 0 vs. 4 Gamelin: 2 vs. 1 Needham:...
ac15's user avatar
  • 497
10 votes

What is the terminology for "self-referral" integrals in calculus?

To my knowledge, this is most commonly known as "cyclic" integration by parts.
Justin Skycak's user avatar
9 votes

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

I generally take a more descriptivist (rather than prescriptivist) view of language. If a particular phrase is commonly used by competent native speakers of a language, then the phrase is correct, ...
Xander Henderson's user avatar
  • 8,223
9 votes

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

I guess you could get away with either, but strictly speaking, grammatically, the correct term is "purely imaginary." "pure imaginary number" means that the number is being ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
5 votes

Is it correct to state that a cone has no faces?

This isn't a bad question, it's a good opportunity to discuss how mathematical definitions are made and their relative merits. In convex geometry, a face of a convex body $K$ is the intersection $K \...
David E Speyer's user avatar
5 votes

How should an educator answer a student who asks "Can this theorem be deduced in other systems of set theory?"

would it be fair to ensure that the course description and course syllabus include the name of the particular system of set theory that all theorems studied in the course are deduced from? No, ...
KCd's user avatar
  • 3,536
5 votes

Educational resources commonly address slant asymptotes. Why not general polynomial asymptotes?

This is kind of a joke answer, but in my favorite math story ever we have the following exchange: Eric pondered a moment. "But... but if it's that simple, why don't my textbooks talk about it?&...
Steven Gubkin's user avatar
4 votes

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

It depends whether you think of "imaginary" as an adjective (a property of a subset of numbers) or a noun (a shortened name for the set of imaginary numbers). "Purely imaginary" ...
Nullius in Verba's user avatar
4 votes

Examples of different languages with mathematically different names for concepts

When I introduce the concept of an antiderivative in my calculus class, I mention that in my native German, it is called a Stammfunktion (stem-function, with "stem" as in "source", ...
Torsten Schoeneberg's user avatar
4 votes

What's it called when multiple concepts are combined into a single problem?

Many textbooks simply identify these as "Applications". Of course, the more bits and pieces that need to be pulled in and synthesized for a problem, the more challenging it will be. Some ...
Daniel R. Collins's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Educational resources commonly address slant asymptotes. Why not general polynomial asymptotes?

I think it is just that the related concepts encompassed by little-$o$ and big-$O$ notation are more important than "polynomial asymptotes" and do find many applications. We do teach Landau ...
user52817's user avatar
  • 11k
3 votes

Naming the procedure of converting the place values of digits

I think this is just called "converting between place value." If you Google that phrase, you'll see tons of hits that include problems like the one you referenced. For instance, IXL (one of ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Does the "Middle School Mathematics domains" refer to (I) through (V) topics?

Yes. It says all questions assess content from the above Middle School Mathematics domains, and the only thing directly above is the table. And the only text fields in the table are the content ...
Justin Skycak's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to state that a cone has no faces?

AT the end of the day, it just depends on how you want to define things and becomes a bit of a semantics game. (We used to have a guy who was obsessing over squares versus rectangles. We also get ...
guest troll's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to state that a cone has no faces?

This answer explains why this question can't be answered (but it does not fit inside a comment section). First of all: what is a cone? According to this Wikipedia-page, a cone has a circular ground ...
Dominique's user avatar
  • 2,165
2 votes

The word "numeral", is it being taught and does the word exist for it in your language?

I was taught "numeral" in the New Math era, and if you had asked me in my youth what it meant, I would have probably replied, "What? You mean like zero through nine?" In my mind, I ...
user1815's user avatar
  • 5,760
2 votes

Naming the procedure of converting the place values of digits

I don't believe there is a set phrase for this, other than "conversion". However, conversion is very broad because it also includes factors that are not powers of the base that you are ...
Flater's user avatar
  • 217
2 votes
Accepted

How should an educator answer a student who asks "Can this theorem be deduced in other systems of set theory?"

[Personal prelude: once in a model theory course we were being presented a proof of Ramsey's theorem, which I found very similar in spirit to some proofs of Bolzano-Weierstrass, so I mentioned it and ...
ac15's user avatar
  • 497
2 votes

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

Following Wikipedia (a good source for non natives): purely imaginary. Remark: Originally, this answer was a comment. However, I accepted Taladris' suggestion to include it as an answer. In the words ...
Pedro's user avatar
  • 1,800
1 vote

"Pure Imaginary" or "Purely Imaginary"?

This is really a question for English Learners but let’s go: The word imaginary is an adjective; that is, it modifies a noun. You might have an imaginary friend, ...
Michael Lorton's user avatar
1 vote

What is the terminology for "self-referral" integrals in calculus?

From Does integration by parts with "deja vu" have a name?: Sheard ("Trick or Technique?", 2009) calls it the one-step algebra trick; OP says he saw it called integration by parts ...
user182601's user avatar
1 vote

Idea of using LLMs to help communicate ideas in math

If people find it helpful, that's fine. The author of a text is still responsible for the final version, whether it was aided by an LLM or not. I have some quibbles with the specific examples in the ...
user22788's user avatar
  • 854
1 vote

Naming the procedure of converting the place values of digits

It is called converting of units: if you have 2.263,3 m you can convert it to 226.330cm o 2263.3300mm and so on . when you write 2.263,3 thousands probably you mean in units 2.263,3*1m=2.263,3m *...
trula's user avatar
  • 449

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible