user52817
  • Member for 7 years, 7 months
  • Last seen this week
Hypothesis Tests in Students' Lives
5 votes

Students in the class could google their birth dates before class and come to class knowing the day of the week on which they were born (MTWRF). In class you then test the hypothesis that days of ...

View answer
How does one explain that transformations 'inside' a function operate in the opposite direction than intuition suggests?
7 votes

I think a key tool here is tables of values. My approach has always been to give students functions like $f(x)=x^2$ and $g(x)=f(x-1)$ and ask them to fill out tables of values for some range of $x$, ...

View answer
What is a good reason to change calculus texts?
4 votes

We make good use of WeBWorK in many of our mathematics courses. WeBWorK is an open source online homework system supported by the MAA. My university uses a textbook rental system. When the stock of ...

View answer
Using joke / song / film / pop culture to exhibit a new mathematical concept
2 votes

I think the video "Jokes with Einstein" about crossing an elephant and a banana is just right for a course such as Calculus III when you introduce cross products. Here is a link http://www.youtube....

View answer
Unique candidate that fails
2 votes

The enigmatic "field with one element" comes to mind. This is a non-existent object that behaves like a finite field, but which has only one element. There is a rich history of deep mathematics that ...

View answer
Is there a simple explanation for calculus classes of why partial fractions work?
6 votes

I have always found it instructive and fun to address this by thinking graphically. Students in Calculus II will know the graphs of the rational functions $f(x)=\frac{ax+b}{(x-c)(x-d)}$ and $g(x)=\...

View answer
Teaching advanced math using books with cartoons
3 votes

Be sure to look Logicomix: An Epic Search for Truth, by Doxiadis.

View answer
What is the rationale for the absent (+) in mixed fractions?
5 votes

The university math department where I work runs a math competition for high school students each year. One year there was a problem with answer $7/2$. May students put $3\frac{1}{2}$ down as the ...

View answer
Early vs. late transcendentals
5 votes

Many places have Calculus I as a co-requisite for University Physics I. The physics instructors like students in thier class to be familiar with derivatives of exponential functions before the end of ...

View answer
1 2 3 4
5