New answers tagged

0

When I was in my high-school, I was a kid that solved all the questions quickly. This thing was good practice for me and I loved it when I was appreciated. But what I think personally is, healthy competition is always a good part of the learning process. I have a suggestion for the similar : Conducting group activities You can divide the class into groups ...


2

As someone who was not too long ago in middle school, I have fond memories of working on AMC 8 or AMC 10 problems once I finished my school work. These are competitions for middle and beginning high school students that typically require much more thought than standard classes. These problems would also make for great discussions if you wanted to steer your ...


11

One option is to assign tasks with a low floor, but high ceiling. That means that almost everyone has the background to start tinkering, and accomplish something, but there is enough complexity and variation that one could keep discovering new things for a very long time. This naturally differentiates instruction. Engaging tasks of this form are hard to ...


6

I taught gifted students and had many fast finishers. Here are some of things we did (most require no preparation on your part but some require resources that you may not have): I kept a supply of Think Fun puzzles. These are solitaire brain teasers that the students enjoyed. Some of my classes had access to tablets/computers and the students were allowed ...


18

Stuff for fast finishers/gifted kids should be out of the stream --stuff that isn't what you're covering next week or next year. Look at puzzles -- especially geometrical ones. Graph theory -- Bridges of Konigsburg, three houses, three wells. Chess board problems. There are lots of good puzzlebooks out there. Logic puzzles too. Mechanical puzzles too. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included