9

I am unaware of standard mathematical texts for engineers at a level beyond that of the usual advanced engineering mathematics texts. Perhaps the closest thing in some sense might be Strang's classic Introduction to Applied Mathematics or his more recent Computational Science and Engineering. While the aforementioned books do overlap with typical advanced ...


9

Of course it depends on how much time you're willing to spend on this. If the answer is "very little" then no chance that you can say something more than "in the future this will be useful for you"... So I start from the idea that you can devote at least one hour to this. And it better be a well prepared one, otherwise time will not be enough. Codes: I do ...


8

Two Four ideas: (1) "composing linear transformations": Use rotation, scaling, and shearing. If you extend to homogenous coordinates, you can include translations. Fundamental to all computer graphics. Explore which combinations of these transformations always commute, and which sometimes do not commute. In $\mathbb{R}^2$ and in $\mathbb{R}^3$. E.g., ...


7

In our department, large introductory math courses, such as calculus, linear algebra, and discrete mathematics, come together with little satellite courses called "advanced investigations in *", where * is the main course. Students who want to explore the subject in depth register for the main course and the satellite course. Example: in main Calculus I, ...


7

I would start with a discussion with the Engineering department about what it is they want the students to learn. Teaching different skills will need different methods, so you might as well start with learning what will help you most in the short term. Personally, my experience suggests proofs are likely to be very low priority, with a focus on calculation ...


7

Not certain this satisfies your set of criteria, but... This is a challenging but wonderful book. Arnold emphasizes the geometry of manifolds throughout: differential forms, Riemannian geometry, symplectic geometry, Lie groups and Lie algebras, dynamical systems, integrable systems. Arnold, Vladimir Igorevich. Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics. ...


7

It occurs to me that maybe you can approach this from the viewpoint of approximations. Briefly, I’m thinking of the kinds of approximations they likely use in practice, and which are often given in an appendix at the back of texts, such as the following: For $x \approx 0$ we have $\frac{1}{1-x} \approx 1+x$ (multiply numerator and denominator of left side ...


6

Geometric Methods and Applications for Computer Science and Engineering, by J. Gallier, does the job for what concerns classical differential geometry. Elasticity and Geometry by Audoly-Pomeau addresses a classical problem with many important applications with quite advanced math techniques. As for Linear Algebra, I'd like to mention Applied linear algebra ...


6

Here are two activities I have used. The second does not fit in an hour, however. (1) Give the students maybe two different sizes and thickness of paper. Ideally, the two are quite different. Their goal is to design a paper airplane that flies the longest distance when launched from a standard height. Depending how ambitious you are, you could even brush up ...


5

(edited) I have used Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, fifth edition, as an undergrad, a practicing engineer, and in grad school. I love it. (1) It is in English, composed in English, good English, but written by a German native speaker mathematician. Not sure that this matters but might be positive. (2) One of high repute, check out his books ...


5

Surprisingly not yet mentioned is Advanced Mathematical Methods for Scientists and Engineers by Carl M. Bender and Steven A. Orszag Below are some comments about this book I made in a 10 January 2007 sci.math post archived at Math Forum: I had a course out of this book 23 years ago. If someone or some company had approached me (or I had known who to ...


5

I strongly agree with Douglas Zare that it is highly dependent on what incoming students are prepared for in terms of their mathematical background beforehand. As far what is the minimum calculus knowledge that engineers need, this too is dependent on what field of engineering they go into. I know several engineers that use no more than basic trigonometry ...


5

I think you need to build a support network locally. Even if it means going outside the university to a nearby university, you will need mentors, fellow TA's, administrators, and others to help you not just understand and solve the problems you currently see, but to anticipate problems and improve your efforts as a teaching assistant. Even going outside ...


5

Let me suggest the following story: if we consider $z = x+iy$ as a point in the complex plane then we have $z = (x,y)$ in the usual Cartesian coordinate notation. Since $$ z=x+iy = x(1)+y(i) = x(1,0)+y(0,1)$$ we have $1=(1,0)$ and $i=(0,1)$ in this approach. Viewing $z=(x,y)$ as a vector based at the origin we have: $$ \boxed{z = r\hat{r}} $$ where $\hat{r}...


4

"What is my mission when I teach math for engineering students?" I think it is possible to zig-zag between applications and appreciation of the history and the beauty of the mathematics underlying those applications. An example is the "simple suspension bridge," which follows a catenary. There is interesting history here, in that Galileo realized the curve ...


4

I learned linear algebra (decades ago) as an "adjunct" to "engineering mathematics." The focus of most engineering students is "systems of equations." As long as you remember that, you're fine. So engineers are most focused on those parts of linear algebra that provide solutions to systems of equations, including lower echelon row reduction and eigenvalue ...


3

You should start by figuring out what you want students to understand and be able to do with the material that you will teach them. This includes issues of course content but you should also consider the kinds of exercises and projects that you will assign to students. Some questions that you should consider include: What should the balance between ...


3

In computer science, specifically in combinatorics (much used in algorithm analysis) one important task is to derive asymptotic behaviour of sequences, which in turn are easiest to get in form of a generating function. The techniques used are heavily based on complex analysis. See for example Flajolet and Sedgewick's "Analytic Combinatorics" (Cambridge ...


3

I'd suggest having a look at Geometric Mechanics by Darryl Holm. The theme of developing mechanics in the framework of differential geometry has a considerable record at the graduate level, as indicated in Dave Renfro's comment. At a level suitable for undergraduates, though, the pickings may be slim. Somewhat more accessible than Abraham and Marsden ...


3

I'm currently looking at Steinmann, Geometrical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics (Springer 'Lecture notes in Mathematics and Mechanics' series), as a way of making differential forms relevant and palatable to senior engineering undergraduates.


3

Dave Renfro's advice [below] in his comment to your question is eminently sensible. Familiarize yourself with this particular course and what is expected of the student so you can help him/her best. I would also add that many engineering mathematics courses, but certainly not all, have less emphasis on proofs than courses on the same topic intended for ...


3

I would consider to add two items to the list, both from a systems slant: Predator prey relations. The behavior can be graphically investigated, but the actual solution function is not analytically soluble. Any solid ODE book will cover this. E.g. Speigel's https://www.amazon.com/Applied-Differential-Equations-Murray-Spiegel/dp/0130400971#...


2

You could make the connection between Fourier synthesis and (musical) synthesizers. Maybe you could play some interesting tones from a synthesizer. How do we figure out what goes into the synthesis? Fourier analysis. A lot of students will (sadly) shut down while you're telling them things that "won't be on the test". It would help if you could repeatedly ...


2

Finally there is a book https://www.crcpress.com/A-MatLab-Companion-to-Complex-Variables/Wunsch/p/book/9781498755672 "MATLAB companion to complex variables" published Aug 2016. I can't wait till my library acquire this book.


2

Make a horizontal cantilevered beam. Place it against a horizontal vs. vertical grid. Put progressively heavier weights on the end of it. Trace the shape of the cantilever for each weight. Fit a polynomial to the shape of the curve. Notice whether the deflection is proportional to the weight. Use plastic Slinkies to illustrate S-waves and P-waves. ...


2

First, let me qualify this answer: I am not familiar with the book mentioned in the original post. I have not taught any courses. My engineering courses had weekly problem sets. I am not familiar with very complicated inverse problems, such as X-ray crystallography, CAT scanning, seismography, or echo-based petroleum exploration. The course developer will ...


2

I think you should take whatever motivation you are most excited to show them based on (a) their interests and background (b) your passion and go that way. Everyone will have a different answer to this and so it's important to, with careful consideration, do whatever you, the educator, feels is best. For example, as someone with a geometric bent, I would ...


1

One option is Engineering Mathematics: A Foundation for Electronic, Electrical, Communications, and Systems Engineers by Croft et al. I have taught using this for several years. It is replete with electrical engineering examples and applications, and includes material on such subjects as the Z-transform and Fourier transform, in addition to Fourier series ...


1

Maybe E. Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics


1

My father, a retired engineering professor, told me that engineers think largely in terms of systems of equations. The theory is important, but only to the extent that it serves that end. For instance, students will want to know how and why a system of equations "span" a particular space. As for solution methods, the foundation method is nowadays called "...


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